PHOTOGRAPHIC BIBLIOGRAPHY 1835 – 1869.

In 1990 I published a book titled Nineteenth Century Photography. An Annotated Bibliography 1839 – 1879, by William S. Johnson. Boston: G. K. Hall & Co. The book consisted of 962 pages containing approximately 21,000 bibliographic references drawn from 69 American and British periodicals published during that time, plus a sprinkling of references to more contemporary articles about the photographers already listed in the book. The book was published in a very limited edition and went out of print within a year. Subsequently it has been considered by some photographic historians and listed by several sources as an essential reference source to that period.

Photography was from the first considered as one of the four or five major inventions that brought about the truly modern age. I have always wanted to attempt to trace the large and small impacts which the invention of photography had upon the Anglo-American society and its various cultures during the first few decades of the medium’s existence. The 1990 book did that to some extent, but I was never really completely satisfied with it. So, during the past few years I began utilizing the expanded resources which the computer and the internet made available to scan more than 800 magazines and newspapers of every type, from photographic journals to farmer’s journals to women’s magazines to literary magazines to illustrated weekly newspapers and so on, which were published in the United States and in Great Britain from the late 1830s through 1869 for references to photographic practice. I made a good-faith effort to provide a reasonably complete survey of the uses, impacts and influences of photography upon the published periodical literature of America, England, and to some extent elsewhere, from about 1835 to 1869; and thus, hopefully, to provide an outline of the impacts of the medium upon the culture and society of that period of history which played such a critically important role in the development of our own society and culture.

The approximately 450 magazines and newspapers listed below contained articles in which photography was featured, discussed or mentioned in some illuminating manner, or which acknowledged the use of the medium in the creation of at least some of their illustrations. But because it was the custom and practice of many magazines during this time to reprint translations, excerpts, and even entire articles from other magazines, this list of titles fails to actually delineate the exact range of coverage of this project; and articles about individuals and events from French, German and other periodicals do appear in this bibliography as well.

The project is almost done. I am still cleaning up odds and ends, locating missing issues, attempting to correct errors, etc., but essentially this bibliographic project is complete – or at least finished. I feel that this bibliography is far more than a simple listing of published articles and I hope that it does achieve something of what I had wanted to accomplish; by providing any reader with a specific but focused view into the heart of the mid-nineteenth century culture’s ideas and ideals. It certainly provides a richer context and a more complete outline of the dimensions and scope of the uses of the photography of that time than is commonly available at the present.

In the first bibliography, I occasionally included brief excerpts or annotations for those references in which the citation was unclear by itself. But in this project, with so many highly diverse sources, context is a large part of the significant content of the reference. I therefore frequently included larger excerpts or more extensive annotations for each reference. At this point this work, if it were printed today, set in a 10 point Arial typeface, single spaced, with minimum spacing breaks, etc., (In other words, as tight as reasonably possible) the work would run to something over 8000 pages in length.

Now I find myself with something of a problem. As I said, the scale has gotten out of hand. Publishing anything of 8000 pages in hardcopy would be awkward at best. The finished product will have some tighter editing, but, in a very real way, the discursive nature of the project is the project, and I am certainly reluctant to trim titles or references based on their “importance” or alleged “centrality” to photographic history.

At this time in my life I have been working as what is euphuistically known as an “independent scholar.” In other words, without the support structure of any academic institution or within the purview of any academic systems. Although many kind individuals have been most helpful with advice or solutions to some problem or other, there has never been any formal support for this project from any institution or organization. What that means realistically is increased difficulty in accessing resources, and little or no opportunities for research grants, travel grants, sabbaticals, or other means of funding support. At a more subtle level it means that access to individuals with areas of technical expertise or specific skills that might aid the project is also often far more difficult to obtain. The Web is an extraordinary resource tool, but it isn’t everything. At this point this bibliography exists in the form of a Microsoft Word document. I’ve been mulling over the best and most useful way to publish this work and I am asking for suggestions from any interested parties about preferred formats, publication strategies, and the like.

My best idea at the moment is to self-publish the work in hard copy in six or more volumes. These would be divided, with two (or more, if size necessitates) volumes for each decade: 1839-1849 Part A and Part B, 1850-1859 Part A and Part B and 1860-1869 Part A and Part B.

1839-1849 Part A would consist of the journals arranged alphabetically by title, with the citations arranged chronologically under each title. (This is how the samples below are arranged.) This Part would also include brief essays about each magazine’s use of photography, so that the total would constitute an overview of the impacts of photography on the periodical literature of the decade and would provide, in a very minor way, a supplement to Frank Luther Mott’s magnificent multi-volume A History of American Magazines.

1839-1849 Part B would consist of the same materials arranged by subject. Each reference has a subject heading (Most often the name of an artist or an author, or of a photographic organization, an exhibition, or other very simple, limited  subject categories — such as “History: USA: 1861-1865 (US Civil War” and so on.) so, for example, this arrangement would bring all the Mathew B. Brady references for that decade together. (This is the organization followed in the 1990 book.)

Thus 1839-1849 Part A and 1839-1849 Part B together provide two separate modes of access to the materials, and also two ways of viewing the photographic activity (And, incidentally, the publishing activity on this topic.) of each decade. The following decades would be treated similarly, although as the number of references increases throughout each decade, it may become necessary to publish more than two volumes per decade – thus splitting that period up even more.

I will be able to have the first two volumes ready for printing within the year, and will be investigating publishing costs and trying to establish a reasonable price structure and sales strategy for the work. And then if I sell enough to finance the remainder, the other volumes would follow in succession.

I am not completely pleased with this strategy, as it limits key-word access and other possiblities that contemporary electronic systems make available to researchers. I’ve considered publishing in some electronic format, but my expectation is that libraries – which I assume would be the major market for this reference work– would resist publication in any cd or dvd format, as that format will undoubtedly become obsolete in the (near) future. And I simply don’t have the level of expertise necessary to control the product to publish it on-line, so I hesitate there as well.

I WOULD APPRECIATE ANY COMMENTS OR SUGGESTIONS ABOUT POSSIBLE WAYS OF PROCEEDING FROM THIS POINT –ADVICE ON USEFUL WAYS OF MANIPULATING THE INFORMATION IN WAYS MOST USEFUL FOR OTHER SCHOLARS, ISSUES OF IMPLEMENTING PUBLICATION, POSSIBLE MARKETING STRATEGIES, ETC.

THANK YOU.

BELOW IS A LIST OF THE MAGAZINES AND JOURNALS INDEXED IN THIS DATABASE AS WELL AS A SMALL SAMPLE OF REFERENCES DRAWN FROM TWO OF THE MAGAZINES, WHICH WERE SELECTED AT RANDOM.

LIST OF INDEXED TITLES

The dates following a title listed below correspond to the run of that title only as they fall within the period of coverage of the project (1835-1869), and thus correspond to a record of the coverage of the bibliography—not of the complete run of the periodical.

ABSTRACTS OF THE PAPERS COMMUNICATED TO THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON (1851-1854) London, England

ACADEMY (1869) London, England.

ADVOCATE OF PEACE AND UNIVERSAL BROTHERHOOD (1846) Washington, DC  title change to  ADVOCATE OF PEACE (1847-1869) Washington, DC

AFRICAN REPOSITORY (1850-1869) Washington, DC

ALBION, A JOURNAL OF NEWS, POLITICS AND LITERATURE (1822-1869) New York, NY

ALTA CALIFORNIA (1850-1861) San Francisco, CA

AMARANTH, OR TOKEN OF REMEMBRANCE FOR 18__. (1847-1855) Ashland, OH

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, BOSTON. MEMOIRS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS  AND SCIENCES. (1839-1869) Boston, MA

AMERICAN AGRICULTURIST (1842-1851) New York, NY

AMERICAN ALMANAC AND REPOSITORY OF USEFUL KNOWLEDGE (1830-1861) Boston, MA

AMERICAN ART JOURNAL. A WEEKLY RECORD OF MUSIC, ART AND LITERATURE (1866-1867) New York, NY

AMERICAN ECLECTIC; OR, SELECTIONS FROM THE PERIODICAL LITERATURE OF ALL FOREIGN COUNTRIES  (1839-1843) see ECLECTIC MAGAZINE OF FOREIGN LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND ART (1833-1869) New York, NY

AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL MONTHLY (1864-1867). New York, NY   title change to   AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL MONTHLY, AND NEW YORK TEACHER (1867) New York, NY   title change to   NEW YORK TEACHER AND AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL MONTHLY

AMERICAN FARMER, AND SPIRIT OF THE AGRICULTURAL JOURNALS OF THE DAY (1839-1869) Baltimore, MD

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EDUCATION (1855-1869) Hartford, CT

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MUSIC & MUSICAL VISITOR (1844-1846) Boston, MA

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACY (1835-1869) Philadelphia, PA

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE ALLIED ARTS & SCIENCES (1858-1867) New York, NY

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND ARTS (1859-1869) New Haven, CT

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF THE MEDICAL SCIENCES (1827-1869) Philadelphia, PA

AMERICAN LAW REGISTER (1852-1869)

AMERICAN LAW REVIEW (1866-1869). St. Louis, MO

AMERICAN LITERARY GAZETTE AND PUBLISHERS CIRCULAR (1855-1869) Philadelphia, PA

AMERICAN LITERARY MAGAZINE (1847-1849) Hartford, CT

AMERICAN MASONIC REGISTER AND LITERARY COMPANION (1839-1847) Albany, NY

AMERICAN NATURALIST (1867-1869) Salem, MA

AMERICAN PEOPLE’S JOURNAL OF SCIENCE, LITERATURE, AND ART (1850) New York, NY

AMERICAN PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL AND MISCELLANY (1839-1850) Philadelphia, PA   title change to   AMERICAN PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL: A REPOSITORY OF SCIENCE, LITERATURE, AND GENERAL   INTELLIGENCE (1851-1860) Philadelphia, PA   title change to   AMERICAN PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL AND LIFE ILLUSTRATED: A REPOSITORY OF SCIENCE, LITERATURE,   AND GENERAL INTELLIGENCE (1861-1869) Philadelphia

AMERICAN PRESBYTERIAN AND THEOLOGICAL REVIEW (1863-1868). New York, NY   title change to   AMERICAN PRESBYTERIAN REVIEW (1869-1871). New York, NY

AMERICAN PUBLISHERS’ CIRCULAR AND LITERARY GAZETTE (1855-1862) Philadelphia, PA

AMERICAN QUARTERLY CHURCH REVIEW AND ECCLESIASTICAL REGISTER (1858-1870) New Haven, CT

AMERICAN RAILWAY TIMES (1849-1859) Boston, MA   title change to   RAILWAY TIMES (1860-1872) Boston MA

AMERICAN REPERATORY OF ARTS, SCIENCES AND MANUFACTURES (1840-1842) New York, NY

AMERICAN REVIEW: A WHIG JOURNAL OF POLITICS, LITERATURE, ART AND SCIENCE (1845-1852) New York, NY

AMERICAN THEOLOGICAL REVIEW (1859-1862). New York, NY

ANALYST: A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF SCIENCE, LITERATURE, NATURAL HISTORY, AND THE FINE ARTS   (1834-1840) London, England

ANGLO AMERICAN, A JOURNAL OF LITERATURE, NEWS, POLITICS, THE DRAMA, FINE ARTS, ETC (1843-1847)   New York, NY

ANNUAL OF SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY, OR YEAR-BOOK OF FACTS IN SCIENCE AND ART (1850-1870) Boston, MA

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK, FOR THE  YEARS …. (1840-1869)   New York, NY

ANTHROPOLOGICAL REVIEW (1863-1869) London, England

ANTI-TEAPOT REVIEW (1864-1869) London, England

APPLETON’S JOURNAL OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND ART (1869) New York, NY

ARCTURUS. A JOURNAL OF BOOKS AND OPINION (1840-1842) New York, NY

ARGOSY: A MAGAZINE OF TALES, TRAVELS, ESSAYS, AND POEMS (1865-1869) London, England

ARISTIDEAN: A MAGAZINE OF REVIEWS, POLITICS, AND LIGHT LITERATURE (1845) New York, NY

ARMY AND NAVY CHRONICLE (1839-1842) Washington, DC

ART-UNION: MONTHLY JOURNAL OF THE FINE ARTS AND THE ARTS DECORATIVE, ORNAMENTAL (misc)   (1839-1848) London, England   title change to   ART JOURNAL (1849-1869) London, England

ARTIST: A MONTHLY LADY’S BOOK (1842-1843) New York, NY

ARTHUR’S HOME MAGAZINE (1852-1898)   title change to ARTHUR’S LADY’S HOME MAGAZINE (1857-1860)   title change to   ARTHUR’S HOME MAGAZINE (1861-1869) Philadelphia, PA

ARTHUR’S LADIES’ MAGAZINE OF ELEGANT LITERATURE AND THE FINE ARTS (1844-1845) Philadelphia, PA

ATHENAEUM (LONDON) (1830-1869) London, England

ATHENAEUM (BOSTON) (misc) (1832-????) Boston, MA

ATLANTIC MONTHLY: A MAGAZINE OF LITERATURE, ART AND POLITICS (1857-1865) Boston, MA   title change to   ATLANTIC MONTHLY: A MAGAZINE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, ART AND POLITICS (1865-1969) Boston, MA

BALLOU’S DOLLAR MONTHLY MAGAZINE (1855-1862) Boston, MA   title change to   DOLLAR MONTHLY MAGAZINE (1863-1865) Boston, MA   title change to   BALLOU’S MONTHLY MAGAZINE (1866-1869) Boston, MA

BALLOU’S PICTORIAL DRAWING-ROOM COMPANION (1855-1859) see GLEASON’S

BALTIMORE LITERARY MONUMENT (1838-1839) Baltimore, MD

BALTIMORE PHOENIX AND BUDGET (1841-1842). Baltimore, MD

BANKERS’ MAGAZINE AND STATE FINANCIAL REGISTER (1846-1849) Baltimore, MD

BANKERS’ MAGAZINE AND STATISTICAL REGISTER (1849-1869) New York, NY

BEADLE’S MONTHLY, A MAGAZINE OF TODAY (1866-1867) New York, NY

BEAUX-ARTS. L’INDUSTRIE (misc)

BELGRAVIA: A LONDON MAGAZINE (1866-1869) London, England

BELLE ASSEMBLEE; OR COURT AND FASHIONABLE MAGAZINE (1823-1837) London, England   title change to   COURT MAGAZINE AND BELLE ASSEMBLEE (July 1832-Jan. 1837)   title change to   THE COURT MAGAZINE AND MONTHLY CRITIC (Feb. 1837-Dec. 1837)   title change to   THE COURT MAGAZINE AND MONTHLY CRITIC, AND THE LADY’S MAGAZINE AND MUSEUM (Jan. 1838-Dec.   1838)   title change to COURT AND LADY’S MAGAZINE, MONTHLY CRITIC AND MUSEUM (1839-1848) London, England

BENTLEY’S QUARTERLY REVIEW (1859-1860) London, England

BIBLICAL REPERTORY AND PRINCETON REVIEW see PRINCETON REVIEW

BLACKWOOD’S EDINBURGH MAGAZINE (1839-1869) Edinburgh, Scotland

BLACKWOOD’S EDINBURGH MAGAZINE (NY) (misc) (1839-1869) New York, NY

BOSTON CULTIVATOR (1839-1850) Boston, MA

BOSTON DAILY EVENING TRANSCRIPT (misc) Boston, MA

BOSTON EVENING TRANSCRIPT (misc) Boston, MA

BOSTON HERALD (misc) Boston, MA

BOSTON MEDICAL AND SURGICAL JOURNAL (1828-1851) Boston, MA

BOSTON MISCELLANY OF LITERATURE AND FASHION (1842-1843) Boston, MA

BOSTON RECORDER (1830-1849) Boston, MA

BOSTON WEEKLY MAGAZINE. DEVOTED TO MORAL AND ENTERTAINING LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE   FINE ARTS (1838-1841) Boston, MA

BRADSHAW’S MANCHESTER JOURNAL (1841) London, England   title change to   BRADSHAW’S JOURNAL: A MISCELLANY OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND ART (1842-1843) London, England

BRITISH AND FOREIGN REVIEW; OR, EUROPEAN QUARTERLY JOURNAL (1835-1844) London, England

BRITISH JOURNAL OF PHOTOGRAPHY (1860-1869) Liverpool, London, England

BROADWAY JOURNAL (1845-1846) New York, NY

BROTHER JONATHAN. A WEEKLY COMPEND OF BELLES LETTRES AND THE FINE ARTS, STANDARD   LITERATURE, AND GENERAL INTELLIGENCE (1842-1843) New York, NY

BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN ART-UNION (1848-1853) New York, NY

BULLETIN DE L’AMI DES ARTS (misc)

BURTON’S GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE AND AMERICAN MONTHLY REVIEW (1839-1840) Philadelphia, PA   see also GRAHAM’S MAGAZINE (1840-1856)

CALIFORNIA CULTURIST: A JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURE, HORTICULTURE, MECHANISM AND MINING   (1859-1860) San Francisco, CA

CAMPBELL’S FOREIGN MONTHLY MAGAZINE; OR, SELECT MISCELLANY OF THE PERIODICAL LITERATURE OF   GREAT BRITAIN (1842-1843) Philadelphia, PA

CASSELL’S MAGAZINE

CATHOLIC TELEGRAPH (1831-1846) Cincinnati, OH

CATHOLIC WORLD, A MONTHLY MAGAZINE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND SCIENCE (1865-1869) New York, NY

CHAMBERS’S EDINBURGH JOURNAL (1832-1853) London, England   title change   CHAMBERS’S JOURNAL OF POPULAR LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND ARTS (1854-1869)

CHEMIST; OR, REPORTER OF CHEMICAL DISCOVERIES AND IMPROVEMENTS, AND PROTECTOR OF THE   RIGHTS OF THE CHEMIST AND CHEMICAL MANUFACTURERAND CHEMICAL MANUFACTURER.   title change to   CHEMIST; A MONTHLY JOURNAL OFCHEMICAL PHILOSOPHY. AND OF CHEMISTEY APPLIED TO THE ARTS,   MANUFACTURES, AGRICULTURE, AND MEDICINE, AND RECORD OF PHARMACY. (  ) London, England

CHARLESTON MERCURY (1861-1865 only) Charleston, SC

CHICAGO MAGAZINE. THE WEST AS IT IS (1857) Chicago, IL

CHICAGO MEDICAL EXAMINER (1860-1869) Chicago, IL

CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE AND JOURNAL (1839-1865) Chicago, IL

CHRISTIAN EXAMINER AND RELIGIOUS MISCELLANY (1844-1857) New York, NY

CHRISTIAN INQUIRER (1846-1864) New York, NY

CHRISTIAN OBSERVATORY: A RELIGIOUS AND LITERARY MAGAZINE (1847-1850) Boston, MA

CHRISTIAN OBSERVER (1840-1860) Louisville, KY

CHRISTIAN PARLOR MAGAZINE (1844-1855) New York, NY

CHRISTIAN RECORDER (1861-1869) Philadelphia, PA

CHRISTIAN REFLECTOR (1838-1848) Boston, MA

CHRISTIAN REGISTER AND BOSTON OBSERVER (1835-1843) Boston, MA   title change to   CHRISTIAN REGISTER (1843-1850) Boston, MA

CHRISTIAN REVIEW (1836-1863) Boston, MA

CHRISTIAN WATCHMAN (1839-1848) Boston, MA

CHURCH REVIEW, AND ECCLESIASTICAL REGISTER (1848-1858) New Haven, CT

CINCINNATI DAILY CHRONICAL (misc) Cincinnati, OH

CINCINNATI WEEKLY HERALD AND PHILANTHROPIST (1843-1846) Cincinnati, OH

CLASSICAL MUSEUM: A JOURNAL OF PHILOLOGY, AND OF ANCIENT HISTORY AND LITERATURE (1844-1850)   London, England

COLMAN’S RURAL WORLD (1865-1869) St. Louis, MO

COLORED AMERICAN (1837-1841) New York, NY

COLUMBIAN LADY’S AND GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE, EMBRACING LITERATURE IN EVERY DEPARTMENT:   EMBELLISHED WITH THE FINEST STEEL AND MEZZOTINT ENGRAVINGS, MUSIC, AND COLORED FASHIONS   (1844-1849) New York, NY

COMMERCIAL REVIEW OF THE SOUTH AND WEST (1846-1850) New Orleans, LA

CONGREGATIONAL QUARTERLY. CONDUCTED UNDER THE SANCTION OF THE CONGREGATIONAL LIBRARY   ASSOCIATION AND THE AMERICAN CONGREGATIONAL UNION. (1859-1869)

CONNECTICUT COMMON SCHOOL JOURNAL AND ANNALS OF EDUCATION, (1851-1866) Hartford, CT

CONTINENTAL MONTHLY: DEVOTED TO LITERATURE AND NATIONAL POLICY (1862-1864) New York, NY

CORSAIR: A GAZETTE OF LITERATURE, ART, DRAMATIC CRITICISM, FASHION & NOVELTY (1839-1840)   New York, NY

COSMOPOLITAN ART JOURNAL (1856-1861) New York, NY

CRAYON (1855-1861) New York, NY

CRITERION. LITERARY AND CRITICAL JOURNAL. (1855-1856) New York, NY

CRITIC, LONDON LITERARY JOURNAL (1851) London, England

CULTIVATOR (1834-1865) Albany, NY

DAGUERREIAN JOURNAL (1850-1851) New York, NY   title change to   HUMPHREY’S JOURNAL OF PHOTOGRAPHY, AND THE ALLIED ARTS AND SCIENCES (1852-1862) New York, NY

DAGUERREOTYPE: A MAGAZINE OF FOREIGN LITERATURE AND SCIENCE: COMPILED CHIEFLY FROM THE   PERIODICAL PUBLICATIONS OF ENGLAND, FRANCE, AND GERMANY (1847-1849). Boston, MA

DAILY SCIENTIFIC PRESS (   ) ??

DEBOW’S REVIEW, AGRICULTURAL, COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS AND RESOURCES (1846-1869)   New Orleans, LA

DIAL: A MAGAZINE FOR LITERATURE, PHILOSOPHY, AND RELIGION (1840-1844) Boston. MA

DISTRICT SCHOOL JOURNAL OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK (1840-1852) Albany, NY

DOLLAR MAGAZINE (1851) see HOLDEN’S DOLLAR MAGAZINE

DOLLAR MAGAZINE; A MONTHLY GAZETTE OF CURRENT LITERATURE, MUSIC AND ART (1841-1842) New York,   NY

DOLLAR MONTHLY MAGAZINE (1863-1865) see BALLOU’S DOLLAR MONTHLY MAGAZINE

DOUGLASS’ MONTHLY (1859-1862) Rochester, NY

DRAMATIC MIRROR AND LITERARY COMPANION (1841-1842) New York, NY

DUBLIN REVIEW (1839-1869) London, England

DUBLIN SATURDAY MAGAZINE: A JOURNAL OF INSTRUCTION AND AMUSEMENT, COMPRISING IRISH   BIOGRAPHY AND ANTIQUITIES, ORIGINAL TALES AND SKETCHES, POETRY, VARIETIES, ETC. (1865-1867)   Dublin, Ireland

DUBLIN UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE (1839-1869) Dublin, Ireland

DUBUQUE DAILY EXPRESS AND HERALD (misc) Dubuque, IA

DUFFY’S HIBERNIAN MAGAZINE: A MONTHLY JOURNAL OF LEGENDS, TALES, AND STORIES, IRISH   ANTIQUITIES, BIOGRAPHY, SCIENCE, AND ART (1860-1864) Dublin, Ireland.

DWIGHTS AMERICAN MAGAZINE, AND FAMILY NEWSPAPER, FOR THE DIFFUSION OF USEFUL KNOWLEDGE   AND MORAL AND RELIGIOUS PRINCIPLE (1845-1851) New York

EAST ANGLIAN, OR, NOTES AND QUERIES ON SUBJECTS CONNECTED WITH THE COUNTIES OF SUFFOLK, CAMBRIDGE, ESSEX AND NORFOLK

ECLECTIC MAGAZINE OF FOREIGN LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND ART (1833-1869) New York, NY   first published as   MUSEUM OF FOREIGN LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND ART (1839-1842)   title change to   AMERICAN ECLECTIC AND MUSEUM OF FOREIGN LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND ART (Jan. 1843–Jan. 1844)   title change to   ECLECTIC MAGAZINE OF FOREIGN LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND ART (1844–1869) New York, NY

ECLECTIC REVIEW (1839-1868) London, England

EDINBURGH REVIEW, OR CRITICAL JOURNAL (1830-1869) Edinburgh, Scotland

EDINBURGH REVIEW (AMERICAN EDITION) (    ) New York, NY

EMANCIPATOR AND REPUBLICAN (1844-1850) BOSTON, MA

EMERSON’S MAGAZINE AND PUTNAM’S MONTHLY see PUTNAM’S MONTHLY

EPISCOPAL RECORDER (1831-1851) Philadelphia, PA

EVANGELICAL MAGAZINE AND GOSPEL ADVOCATE (1830-1848) Utica, NY

EVERGREEN: A MONTHLY MAGAZINE OF NEW AND POPULAR TALES AND POETRY (1840-1841) New York, NY

EVERY SATURDAY: A JOURNAL OF CHOICE READING, SELECTED FROM FOREIGN CURRENT LITERATURE   (1866-1874) Boston, MA

EXPOSITOR, A WEEKLY JOURNAL OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE, LITERATURE (1838-1839)   New York, NY

FAMILY CIRCLE & PARLOR ANNUAL (misc.) New York, NY

FAMILY MAGAZINE; OR, MONTHLY ABSTRACT OF GENERAL KNOWLEDGE (1833-1841) New York, NY

FARMER’S MAGAZINE (1840-1869) London, England

FARMERS’ REGISTER: A MONTHLY PUBLICATION (1833-1843) Shellbanks, VA

FLAG OF OUR UNION (1854-1869) Boston, MA

FINE ARTS ALMANACK, OR, ARTIST’S REMEMBRANCER FOR THE YEAR (1850-1852) London, England

FINE ARTS QUARTERLY REVIEW (1863-1867) London, England

FINE ARTS’ JOURNAL; A WEEKLY RECORD OF PAINTING, SCULPTURE, ARCHITECTURE, MUSIC, THE DRAMA,   AND POLITE LITERATURE. (1846-1847) London, England

FOEDERAL AMERICAN MONTHLY (1865) New York, NY

FOREIGN AND COLONIAL QUARTERLY REVIEW (1843-1844) London, England   title change to   NEW QUARTERLY REVIEW; OR, HOME, FOREIGN AND COLONIAL JOURNAL (1844-1847) London, England

FOREIGN QUARTERLY REVIEW (1827-1846) London, England   title change to   WESTMINSTER AND FOREIGN QUARTERLY REVIEW. (1846-1847)

FORRESTER’S BOYS’ AND GIRLS’ MAGAZINE, AND FIRESIDE COMPANION (1851-1857) Boston, MA

FORTNIGHTLY REVIEW (1865-1869) London, England

FRANK LESLIE’S ILLUSTRATED NEWSPAPER (     ) New York, NY

FRANK LESLIE’S NEW YORK JOURNAL (     ) New York, NY

FREDERICK DOUGLASS’ PAPER (1851-1860) Rochester, NY

FREED-MAN: A MONTHLY MAGAZINE DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE FREED COLOURED PEOPLE   (1866-1868) London, England

FRIEND; A RELIGIOUS AND LITERARY JOURNAL (1839-1869) Philadelphia, PA

FRIENDS’ REVIEW; A RELIGIOUS, LITERARY AND MISCELLANEOUS JOURNAL (1847-1869) Philadelphia, PA

FRIENDS’ WEEKLY INTELLIGENCER (1844-1853) Philadelphia, PA   title change to   FRIEND’S INTELLIGENCER (1853-1869) Philadelphia, PA

GALAXY. A MAGAZINE OF ENTERTAINING READING (1866-1869) New York, NY

GENESEE FARMER (1845-1865) Rochester, NY

GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (1830-1869) London, England

GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (1837-1839) Philadelphia, PA

GERMAN REFORMED MESSENGER (1851-1867) Philadelphia, PA

GLASGOW MECHANICS’ MAGAZINE  (    ) Glasgow, Scotland

GLEASON’S PICTORIAL DRAWING-ROOM COMPANION (1851-1854) Boston, MA   title change to   BALLOU’S PICTORIAL DRAWING-ROOM COMPANION (1855-1859) Boston, MA

GODEY’S LADY’S BOOK (1840-1858) New York, NY   title change to   GODEY’S LADY’S BOOK AND MAGAZINE (1859-1869) New York, NY

GOLDEN HOURS: AN ILLUSTRATED MONTHLY MAGAZINE FOR FAMILY AND GENERAL READING (1868-1869)   London, England

GOOD WORDS (1860-1869) London, England

GRAHAM’S MAGAZINE (1840-1858) Philadelphia, PA   continues BURTON’S GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE AND AMERICAN MONTHLY REVIEW (1839-1840)   suffered many title and subtitle changes throughout its run   GRAHAM’S LADY’S AND GENTLEMEN’S MAGAZINE (1841-1842, 1843-1844)   to   GRAHAM’S MAGAZINE OF LITERATURE AND ART (1843)   to   GRAHAM’S AMERICAN MONTHLY MAGAZINE OF LITERATURE, ART, AND FASHION (1844-1856)   to   GRAHAM’S ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE (1856-1858) Philadelphia, PA

GREAT REPUBLIC MONTHLY (1859) New York, NY

GREEN MOUNTAIN GEM; A MONTHLY JOURNAL OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS (1843-1849) Bradford

HARBINGER: DEVOTED TO SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PROGRESS (1845-1849) New York, NY

HARPER’S BAZAAR (1867-1869) New York, NY

HARPER’S NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE (1850-1869) New York, NY

HARPER’S WEEKLY: A JOURNAL OF CIVILIZATION (1857-1869) New York, NY

HERALD OF HEALTH AND JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CULTURE (1864-1869) New York, NY

HERALD OF TRUTH, A MONTHLY PERIODICAL DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF RELIGION (1847) Cincinnati, OH

HESPERIAN: A MONTHLY MISCELLANY OF GENERAL LITERATURE, ORIGINAL AND SELECTED (1838-1839)   Cincinnati, OH

HISTORICAL MAGAZINE, AND NOTES AND QUERIES CONCERNING THE ANTIQUITIES, HISTORY, AND   BIOGRAPHY OF AMERICA (1857-1869) Boston, MA

HOGG’S WEEKLY INSTRUCTOR (1845-1849) Edinburgh, Scotland   title change to   HOGG’S INSTRUCTOR. (1849-1856)   title change to   TITAN. A MONTHLY MAGAZINE (1856-1859)

HOLDEN’S DOLLAR MAGAZINE OF CRITCISMS, BIOGRAPHIES, SKETCHES, ESSAYS, TALES, REVIEWS,   POETRY, ETC., ETC. (1848-1851) New York, NY   title change to   DOLLAR MAGAZINE (1851) New York, NY

HOME FRIEND (1852-1856) London, England

HOME JOURNAL: FOR THE CULTIVATION OF THE MEMORABLE, THE PROGRESSIVE, AND THE BEAUTIFUL   (1846-1869) New York, NY

HORTICULTURIST AND JOURNAL OF RURAL ARTS AND RURAL TASTE (1846-1869) Albany, NY

HOURS AT HOME; A POPULAR MONTHLY OF INSTRUCTION AND RECREATION (1865-1869) New York, NY

HOUSEHOLD WORDS CONDUCTED BY CHARLES DICKENS (1850-1859) London, England

HUMPHREY’S JOURNAL OF PHOTOGRAPHY see DAGURREIAN JOURNAL

HYGIENIC TEACHER AND WATER-CURE JOURNAL (1862) New York, NY

ILLUMINATED MAGAZINE (1843-1845) London, England

ILLUSTRATED AMERICAN NEWS (    ) New York, NY

ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS (1842-1869) London, England

ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE OF ART (1853-1854) New York, NY

ILLUSTRATED NEWS (LONDON) (1848?-1869?) London, England

ILLUSTRATED NEWS (NEW YORK) (1853) New York, NY

ILLUSTRATED NEWS OF THE WORLD AND DRAWING ROOM PORTRAIT GALLERY OF EMINENT PERSONAGES ()   London, England

IMPERIAL MAGAZINE (1826) London, England

INDEPENDENT (1848-1869) New York, NY

INTELLECTUAL OBSERVER: REVIEW OF NATIONAL HISTORY, MICROSCOPIC RESEARCH AND RECREATIVE   SCIENCE (1862-1868) London, England

INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE OF LITERATURE, ART, AND SCIENCE (1850-1852) New York, NY

IMPERIAL MAGAZINE; OR, COMPENDIUM OF RELIGIOUS, MORAL, & PHILOSOPHICAL KNOWLEDGE (1819-1834)   London, England

JOHN – DONKEY (1848) New York, NY

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN GEOGRAPHICAL AND STATISTICAL SOCIETY (1859, 1870) New York, NY

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY (1843-1869) Boston, MA

JOURNAL OF BELLES LETTRES (1832-1842) Philadelphia, PA

JOURNAL OF CLASSICAL AND SACRED PHILOLOGY (1854-1856) Cambridge, England

JOURNAL OF SACRED LITERATURE (1848-1855) London. England   title change   JOURNAL OF SACRED LITERATURE AND BIBLICAL RECORD (Apr. 1855-Jan. 1868) London, England

JOURNAL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE, CONTAINING THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION (1869)   New York, NY

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN GEOGRAPHICAL AND STATISTICAL SOCIETY (1859, 1870) New York, NY

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY (1843-1869) New Haven, CT

JOURNAL OF THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON (1864-1870) London, England

JOURNAL OF THE ETHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON (1848-1856) London, England   Continued by   TRANSACTIONS OF THE ETHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON (1861-1869   Continued by   JOURNAL OF THE ETHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON (1869) London, England

JOURNAL OF THE FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, OF THE STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA, FOR THE PROMOTION OF THE   MECHANIC ARTS; DEVOTED TO MECHANICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE, CIVIL ENGINEERING, THE ARTS AND   MANUFACTURES, AND THE RECORDING OF AMERICAN AND OTHER PATENT INVENTIONS (1828-1851)   Philadelphia, PA

JOURNAL OF THE PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY (    ) London, England

JOURNAL OF THE PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY OF LONDON (    ) London, England

JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON (1832-1869) London, England

JOURNAL OF THE SOCIETY OF ARTS (LONDON) London, England

JOURNAL OF THE STATISTICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON (1838-1869) London, England

KALEIDOSCOPE; OR, LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC MIRROR (1820-1831) Liverpool, England

KIDD’S LONDON JOURNAL (1852) London, England   title change to   KIDD’S OWN JOURNAL [with vol. 1:9 (Feb. 28, 1852)] (1852-1854) London, England

KNICKERBOCKER; OR NEW YORK MONTHLY MAGAZINE (1833-1862) New York, NY   title change to

KNICKERBOCKER MONTHLY; A NATIONAL MAGAZINE (1863) New York, NY

LADIES’ COMPANION, A MONTHLY MAGAZINE; DEVOTED TO LITERATURE AND THE FINE ARTS (1834-1843)   title change to   LADIES’ COMPANION, AND LITERARY EXPOSITOR; A MONTHLY MAGAZINE EMBRACING EVERY DEPARTMENT   OF LITERATURE (1843-1844) New York, NY

LADIES’ GARLAND AND FAMILY WREATH (1837-1850) Philadelphia, PA

LADIES’ PEARL (1840-1842) Lowell, MA

LADIES REPOSITORY, AND GATHERINGS OF THE WEST (1841-1848) Cincinnati,OH   title change to   LADIES REPOSITORY: A MONTHLY PERIODICAL DEVOTED TO LITERATURE, ARTS AND RELIGION (1849-1871)   Cincinnati, OH

LADIES’ WREATH, A MAGAZINE DEVOTED TO LITERATURE, INDUSTRY AND RELIGION (1846-1859) New York, NY

LADY’S HOME MAGAZINE (1857-1860) Philadelphia, PA   see also ARTHUR’S HOME MAGAZINE

LADY’S WESTERN MAGAZINE AND GARLAND OF THE VALLEY (1849) Cincinnatti, OH

LANCET (1839-1869) London, England

LEISURE HOUR: A FAMILY JOURNAL OF INSTRUCTION AND RECREATION (1852-1869) London, England

LIBERATOR (1831-1865) Boston, MA

LIBERTY BELL. BY FRIENDS OF FREEDOM (1839-1858) Boston, MA

LIPPINCOTT’S MAGAZINE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND EDUCATION (1868-1869) Philadelphia, PA

LITERARY GAZETTE, AND JOURNAL OF THE BELLES LETTRES (     ) ??

LITERARY UNION; A JOURNAL OF PROGRESS, IN LITERATURE AND EDUCATION, RELIGION AND POLITICS,   SCIENCE AND AGRICULTURE (1849-1850). Syracuse, NY

LITERARY WORLD (1847-1853). New York, NY

LITTELL’S LIVING AGE (1844-1869) Boston, MA

LIVERPOOL & MANCHESTER PHOTOGRAPHIC JOURNAL [BRITISH JOURNAL OF PHOTOGRAPHY] (   )

LONDON AND EDINBURGH PHILOSOPHICAL MAGAZINE (1832-1840) London, England   title change to LONDON, EDINBURGH AND DUBLIN PHILOSOPHICAL MAGAZINE (1840-1869) London, England

LONDON JOURNAL AND WEEKLY RECORD OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND ART (1845-1869) London, England

LONDON JOURNAL OF ARTS, SCIENCES, & MANUFACTURERS & REPERTORY OF PATENT INVENTIONS   (1839-1854)   title change   NEWTON’S LONDON JOURNAL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES (1855-1866) London, England

LONDON POLYTECHNIC MAGAZINE, AND JOURNAL OF SCIENCE, LITERATURE, AND THE FINE ARTS (1844)   London, England

[LONDON] QUARTERLY REVIEW (1838-1869) London, England

LONDON QUARTERLY REVIEW (Sept. 1853-Jan. 1858)   title change   LONDON REVIEW (Apr. 1858-July 1862)   title change   LONDON QUARTERLY REVIEW (Oct. 1862-Jan. 1932) London, England

LONDON READER: OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, ART AND GENERAL INFORMATION (1863-1869) London, England

LONDON SATURDAY JOURNAL (1839-1842) London, England

LOWELL OFFERING (1840-1845) Lowell, MA

MACMILLAN’S MAGAZINE (1859-1869) London, England

MAGAZINE FOR THE MILLION (1844) New York, NY

MAGAZINE OF ART (    )  ???

MAGAZINE OF SCIENCE AND SCHOOL OF ARTS (1839-1849)   title change   MAGAZINE OF SCIENCE, AND ARTISTS’, ARCHITECTS’ AND BUILDERS’ JOURNAL (1850-1852) London, England

MAGNET: DEVOTED TO THE INVESTIGATION OF HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY (   ) ??

MAGNOLIA; OR, SOUTHERN APALACHIAN (1842-1843) Charleston, SC

MAINE FARMER AND JOURNAL OF THE USEFUL ARTS (1833-1842) Augusta, ME   title change to   MAINE FARMER AND MECHANICS ADVOCATE (1842-1843) Augusta, ME   title change to   MAINE FARMER: A FAMILY NEWSPAPER, DEVOTED TO AGRICULTURE, MECHANIC ARTS, LITERATURE,   GENERAL INTELLIGENCE, &C., &C. (1844-1869) Augusta, ME

MARYLAND MEDICAL AND SURGICAL JOURNAL, AND OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF   THE ARMY AND NAVY OF THE UNITED STATES (1840)

MASSACHUSETTS MEDICAL SOCIETY. MEDICAL COMMUNICATIONS (1839-1869) Boston, MA

MASSACHUSETTS PLOUGHMAN AND NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURE (1840-1869) Boston, MA

MASSACHUSETTS QUARTERLY REVIEW (1847-1850) Boston, MA

MASSACHUSETTS TEACHER (1848-1855)   title change   MASSACHUSETTS TEACHER AND JOURNAL OF HOME AND SCHOOL EDUCATION (1856-1871). Boston, MA

MATHEMATICAL MONTHLY (1858-1861) Cambridge, MA

MECHANICS’ MAGAZINE, MUSEUM, REGISTER, JOURNAL, AND GAZETTE (1838-1858) London, England

MEDICAL AND SURGICAL REPORTER: A WEEKLY JOURNAL (1858-1869) Philadelphia, PA

see NEW JERSEY MEDICAL REPORTER AND TRANSACTIONS OF THE NEW JERSEY MEDICAL SOCIETY

MEDICAL EXAMINER (1838-1842) Philadelphia, PA   title change to   MEDICAL EXAMINER AND RECORD OF MEDICAL SCIENCE (1844-1853) Philadelphia, PA   title change to   MEDICAL EXAMINER (1854-1856) Philadelphia, PA

MEDICAL NEWS (1843-1869) New York, NY

MERCERSBURG REVIEW (1849-1852) Lancaster, PA   title change to   MERCERSBURG QUARTERLY REVIEW (1853-1856) Lancaster, PA   title change to   MERCERSBURG REVIEW (1857-1869) Lancaster, PA

MERCHANTS’ MAGAZINE AND COMMERCIAL REVIEW (1839-1870) New York, NY

MERRY’S MUSEUM (1841-1851) Boston, MA   title change   MERRY’S MUSEUM AND PARLEY’S MAGAZINE (1852-1857)   title change   MERRY’S MUSEUM, PARLEY’S MAGAZINE, WOODWORTH’S CABINET, AND THE SCHOOLFELLOW (1858-1866)   title change   MERRY’S MUSEUM AND WOODWORTH’S CABINET (1867-1867)   title change MERRY’S MUSEUM FOR BOYS AND GIRLS (1868-1869). Boston, MA

METHODIST QUARTERLY REVIEW (1841-1869) New York, NY

MICHIGAN FARMER (1843-1869) Detroit, MI

MIRROR OF LITERATURE, AMUSEMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (1822-1847) London, England   title change to   MIRROR MONTHLY MAGAZINE (1847-1849) London, England

MISSIONARY HERALD, CONTAINING THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS FOR   FOREIGN MISSIONS FOR THE YEAR . (1839-1869) Boston, MA

MISSIONARY MAGAZINE (BAPTIST) (1850-1872) Boston, MA

MONTHLY CHRONICLE OF EVENTS, DISCOVERIES, IMPROVEMENTS, AND OPINIONS. INTENDED FOR THE   POPULAR DIFFUSION OF USEFUL KNOWLEDGE, AND AN AUTHENTIC RECORD OF FACTS FOR FUTURE   REFERENCE (1840-1842) Boston, MA

MONTHLY LAW REPORTER (1848-1866) Boston, MA

MONTHLY RELIGIOUS MAGAZINE (1844-1856) Boston, MA   title change to   MONTHLY RELIGIOUS MAGAZINE AND INDEPENDENT JOURNAL (1856-1861) Boston, MA   title change to   MONTHLY RELIGIOUS MAGAZINE (1861-1869) Boston, MA

MORRIS’S NATIONAL PRESS, A JOURNAL FOR HOME (1846) New York, NY

MUSICAL MAGAZINE; OR, RESPOSITORY OF MUSICAL SCIENCE, LITERATURE AND INTELLIGENCE (1839-1842)   Boston, MA

MUSICAL TIMES AND SINGING CLASS CIRCULAR (1844-1869) London, England NAUSSAU MONTHLY (1842-1847) Princeton, NJ   title change ..NASSAU LITERARY MAGAZINE (1848-1869). Princeton, NJ

NATION (1861-1869) New York, NY

NATIONAL ERA (1847-1860). Washington, DC

NATIONAL MAGAZINE; DEVOTED TO LITERATURE, ART, AND RELIGION (1852-1858) New York, NY

NATIONAL POLICE GAZETTE (1845-1869) New York, NY [INCOMPLETE]

NATIONAL PREACHER AND VILLAGE PULPIT (1858-1866) New York, NY

NATIONAL REVIEW (1855-1864) London, England.

NATURAL HISTORY REVIEW, AND QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF SCIENCE. (1854-1865) London, England

NEW ENGLAND FAMILY MAGAZINE (1845) Boston, MA

NEW ENGLAND FARMER; A MONTHLY JOURNAL (1848-1869) Boston, MA

NEW-ENGLAND HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL REGISTER (1847-1869) Boston, MA

NEW ENGLANDER (1843-1869) New York, NY

NEW JERSEY MEDICAL REPORTER AND TRANSACTIONS OF THE NEW JERSEY MEDICAL SOCIETY (1847-1854)   title change to   NEW JERSEY MEDICAL REPORTER (1855) Burlington, VT

NEW MIRROR (1843-1844) New York, NY

NEW PATH (1863-1865) New York, NY

NEW SPORTING MAGAZINE (1839-1869) London, England

NEW WORLD; A WEEKLY FAMILY JOURNAL OF POPULAR LITERATURE, SCIENCE, ART AND NEWS (1840-1845)   New York, NY

NEW YORK DAILY CHRONICAL (misc) New York, NY

NEW YORK EVANGELIST (1830-1869) New York, NY

NEW YORK EVENING POST (misc) New York, NY

NEW YORK HERALD (1861-1865 only) New York, NY

NEW YORK ILLUSTRATED ANNUAL (1847) New York, NY

NEW YORK ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE OF LITERATURE AND ART (1845-1847) New York, NY

NEW YORK ILLUSTRATED NEWS (misc) New York, NY

NEW YORK JOURNAL OF MEDICINE AND COLLATERAL SCIENCES (1843-1856) New York, NY   title change to   NEW YORK JOURNAL OF MEDICINE (1856-1860). New York, NY

NEW YORK OBSERVER AND CHRONICLE (1840-1869) New York, NY

NEW YORK REVIEW (1837-1842) New York, NY

NEW YORK STATE MECHANIC, A JOURNAL OF THE MANUAL ARTS, TRADES, AND MANUFACTURES (1841-1843)   Albany, NY

NEW YORK TEACHER AND AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL MONTHLY (1868-1869) New York, NY see AMERICAN   EDUCATIONAL MONTHLY (1864-1867). New York, NY

NEW YORK TIMES (1851-1869) New York, NY [INCOMPLETE]

NEW YORK WEEKLY HERALD (1840-1857) New York, NY

NEW-YORK LEGAL OBSERVER, CONTAINING REPORTS OF CASES DECIDED IN THE COURTS OF EQUITY AND   COMMON LAW, AND IMPORTANT DECISIONS IN THE ENGLISH COURTS; ALSO, ARTICLES ON LEGAL   SUBJECTS, WITH A TABLE OF CASES, A GENERAL INDEX, AND A DIGEST OF THE REPORTS (1842-1854)   New York, NY

NEW-YORK MIRROR: A WEEKLY GAZETTE OF LITERATURE AND THE FINE ARTS (1839-1842) New York, NY

NEW-YORKER. A WEEKLY JOURNAL OF LITERATURE, POLITICS, STATISTICS AND GENERAL INTELLIGENCE   (1836-1841) New York, NY

NEWTON’S LONDON JOURNAL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES (1855-1866) London, England

see LONDON JOURNAL OF ARTS, SCIENCES, & MANUFACTURERS & REPERTORY OF PATENT INVENTIONS

NILES’ NATIONAL REGISTER (1837-1849) Baltimore, MD

NORTH AMERICAN MISCELLANY; A WEEKLY MAGAZINE OF CHOICE SELECTIONS FROM THE CURRENT   LITERATURE OF THIS COUNTRY AND EUROPE (1851). New York,   title change to   NORTH AMERICAN MISCELLANY AND DOLLAR MAGAZINE (1851-1852). New York, NY

NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW (1839-1869) Boston, MA

NORTH BRITISH REVIEW (1844-1871) Edinburgh, Scotland

NORTH STAR (1847-1851) Rochester, NY

NOTES AND QUERIES (1849-1869) London, England

OHIO CULTIVATOR (1845-1866) Columbus, OH

OHIO FARMER (1856-1869) Cleveland, OH

OHIO MEDICAL AND SURGICAL JOURNAL (1848-1869) Columbus, OH

OLD GUARD: A MONTHLY DEVOTED TO THE PRINCIPLES OF 1776 AND 1787 (1863-1870) New York, NY

OLIVER OPTIC’S MAGAZINE. OUR BOYS AND GIRLS (1867-1869) Boston, MA

ONCE A WEEK (1859 – 1869) London, England

ONEIDA CIRCULAR (1851-1869) Brooklyn, NY

ORION, A MONTHLY MAGAZINE OF LITERATURE AND ART (1842-1844) Penfield, GA

OUR YOUNG FOLKS. AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE FOR BOYS AND GIRLS (1865-1873) Boston, MA

OVERLAND MONTHLY AND OUT WEST MAGAZINE (1868-1869) San Francisco, CA

PALLADIUM: A MONTHLY JOURNAL OF LITERATURE, POLITICS, SCIENCE AND ART (1850-1851)   Edinburgh, Scotland

PATHFINDER (1843) New York, NY

PENNY ILLUSTRATED NEWS (1849-1850) London, England

PENNY MAGAZINE OF THE SOCIETY FOR THE DIFFUSION OF USEFUL KNOWLEDGE (1832-1845)   London, England

PEOPLE’S JOURNAL (1846-1847) London, England

PEOPLE’S MAGAZINE AN ILLUSTRATED MISCELLANY FOR ALL CLASSES (1867-1869) London, England

PETERSON’S MAGAZINE (1849-1869) Philadelphia, PA

PHILADELPHIA ART-UNION REPORTER (1851) Philadelphia, PA

PHILADELPHIA PHOTOGRAPHER (1864-1869) Philadelphia, PA

PHILANTHROPIST (1836-1843) Cincinnati, OH

PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON (1666-1869) London, England

PHOTOGRAPHIC ART JOURNAL (1851-1853) New York, NY   title change to   PHOTOGRAPHIC AND FINE ART JOURNAL (1854-1860) New York, NY

PHOTOGRAPHIC NEWS (1858-1859, 1860-1865) London, England

PIONEER; OR, CALIFORNIA MONTHLY MAGAZINE (1854-1855) San Francisco, CA

PLOUGH, THE LOOM AND THE ANVIL (1848-1857) Philadelphia, PA

POPULAR SCIENCE REVIEW (1861-1869) London, England.

POUGHKEEPSIE CASKET: A SEMI – MONTHLY LITERARY JOURNAL, DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO THE   DIFFERENT BRANCHES OF POLITE LITERATURE (1836-1841) Poughkeepsie, NY

POWDER MAGAZINE (1868-1869) London, England

PRACTICAL MECHANIC’S JOURNAL (    ) London, England

PRAIRIE FARMER (1843-1869) Chicago, IL

PRINCETON REVIEW (1837-1869)

PRISONER’S FRIEND. A MONTHLY MAGAZINE DEVOTED TO CRIMINAL REFORM, PHILOSOPHY, SCIENCE,   LITERATURE, AND ART (1845-1857) Boston, MA

PROCEEDINGS OF THE ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES OF PHILADELPHIA (1842-1869) Philadelphia, PA

PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY (1838-1869) Philadelphia, PA

PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON (1855-1869) London, England

PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON (1855-1869) London, England

PROCEEDINGS OF THE SOCIETY OF ANTIQUARIES OF LONDON (1843-1864) London, England

PROVIDENCE JOURNAL (misc) Providence, RI

PROVINCIAL FREEMAN (1854-1857) Chatham, Canada West

PUTNAM’S MONTHLY MAGAZINE OF AMERICAN LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND ART (1853-1857) New York, NY   title change to   EMERSON’S MAGAZINE AND PUTNAM’S MONTHLY (1857-1858) New York, NY   title changed to   PUTNAM’S MAGAZINE. ORIGINAL PAPERS ON LITERATURE, SCIENCE, ART AND NATIONAL INTERESTS   (1868-1870). New York, NY

QUARTERLY REVIEW (    ) ??

QUARTERLY STATEMENT OF THE PALESTINE EXPLORATION FUND (1869) London, England

RADICAL (1865-1872). Boston, MA

RAGGED SCHOOL UNION MAGAZINE (1849-1869) London, England

RAILWAY TIMES (1860-1872) Boston MA see AMERICAN RAILWAY TIMES

RECREATIVE SCIENCE: A RECORD AND REMEMBRANCER OF INTELLECTUAL OBSERVATION (1859-1862) ..title change to   THE INTELLECTUAL OBSERVER. REVIEW OF NATURAL HISTORY MICROSCOPIC RESEARCH, RECREATIVE   SCIENCE (1862-1868)   title change to   THE STUDENT AND INTELLECTUAL OBSERVER (1868-1869) London, England

REFORMED CHURCH MESSENGER (1867-1874) Philadelphia, PA

REPORT OF THE NINTH MEETING OF THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE.   PART 2. NOTICES AND ABSTRACTS OF COMMUNICATIONS (    ) London, England

REYNOLD’S MISCELLANY OF ROMANCE, GENERAL LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND ART (1846-1869)   London, England

RIVERSIDE MAGAZINE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. AN ILLUSTRATED MONTHLY (1867-1870) New York, NY

ROBERT MERRY’S MUSEUM (1841-1850) Boston, MA   title change to   MERRY’S MUSEUM AND PARLEY’S MAGAZINE (1852-1857) Boston, MA   title change to   MERRY’S MUSEUM, PARLEY’S MAGAZINE, WOODWORTH’S CABINET, AND THE SCHOOLFELLOW (1858-1866)   title change to   MERRY’S MUSEUM AND WOODWORTH’S CABINET (1867-1867) Boston, MA   title change to   MERRY’S MUSEUM FOR BOYS AND GIRLS (1868-1869) Boston, MA

ROSE, THE SHAMROCK AND THE THISTLE (1862-1865) Edinburgh, Scotland.

ROUND TABLE. A SATURDAY REVIEW OF POLITICS, FINANCE, LITERATURE, SOCIETY AND ART   (1863-1869). New York, NY

ROVER: A WEEKLY MAGAZINE OF TALES, POETRY, AND ENGRAVINGS, ALSO SKETCHES OF TRAVEL, HISTORY   AND BIOGRAPHY (1843-1845). New York, NY

RUSSELL’S MAGAZINE (1857-1860) Charleston, SC

SAN FRANCISCO ALTA (misc) San Francisco, CA

SARGENT’S NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE, OF LITERATURE, FASHION, AND THE FINE ARTS (1843) New York, NY

SARTAIN’S UNION MAGAZINE OF LITERATURE AND ART (1849-1852) Philadelphia, PA   previously UNION MAGAZINE (1847-1848) New York, NY

SATURDAY EVENING POST (1839-1869) Philadelphia, PA

SATURDAY MAGAZINE (1838-1844) London, England

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN (1845-1869) New York, NY

SCOTTISH REVIEW. A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PROGRESS & GENERAL LITERATURE (1853-1863)   Glasgow, Scotland

SHARPE’S LONDON MAGAZINE, A JOURNAL OF ENTERTAINMENT AND INSTRUCTION FOR GENERAL READING   (1845-1849) London, England

SILLIMAN’S JOURNAL see AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND ARTS

SOUTHERN AGRICULTURIST AND REGISTER OF RURAL AFFAIRS (1828-1839) Charleston, SC   title change   SOUTHERN CABINET OF AGRICULTURE, HORTICULTURE, RURAL AND DOMESTIC ECONOMY (1840)   Charleston, SC

SOUTHERN AND WESTERN LITERARY MESSENGER AND REVIEW (1846-1847) Richmond, VA

SOUTHERN AND WESTERN MONTHLY MAGAZINE AND REVIEW (1845) Charleston, SC

SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER (1834-1845) Richmond, VA title change to   SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER; DEVOTED TO EVERY DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE, AND THE FINE   ARTS (1848-1864) Richmond, VA

SOUTHERN PLANTER (1841-1866) Richmond, VA   title change to   SOUTHERN PLANTER AND FARMER (1867-1869) Richmond, VA

SOUTHERN QUARTERLY REVIEW (1842-1857) New Orleans, NO

SPECTATOR (misc) London, England

SPHINX (1868-1869) Manchester, England

SPIRIT OF THE TIMES; A CHRONICLE OF THE TURF, AGRICULTURE, FIELD SPORTS, LITERATURE AND THE   STAGE (1835-1861) New York, NY

STRYKER’S AMERICAN REGISTER AND MAGAZINE (1850-1851) Philadelphia, PA

SUNDAY AT HOME (1854-1869) London, England

TAIT’S EDINBURGH MAGAZINE (1839-1860) Edinburgh, Scotland

TEMPLE BAR: A LONDON MAGAZINE FOR TOWN AND COUNTRY READERS (1860-1869) London, England

THEOLOGICAL AND LITERARY JOURNAL (1848-1861) New York, NY

TRAIN: A FIRST-CLASS MAGAZINE (1856-1858) London, England

TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY (1839-1869) Philadelphia, PA

TRANSACTIONS OF THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON (1863) London, England (1863) see JOURNAL OF THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON .(1864-1870) London, England

TRANSACTIONS OF THE HISTORIC SOCIETY OF LANCASHIRE AND CHESHIRE. (1849-1869) Lancashire, England.

TRANSACTIONS OF THE SOCIETY OF ARTS, MANUFACTURES, AND COMMERCE (1839-1843/44) London, England

TRUMPET AND UNIVERSALIST MAGAZINE (1839-1851) Boston, MA

TWICE A WEEK: AN ILLUSTRATED LONDON JOURNAL OF ENTERTAINING LITERATURE AND USEFUL   INFORMATION (1862-1862) London, England

UNION MAGAZINE OF LITERATURE AND ART (1847-1848) New York, NY   see SARTAIN’S UNION MAGAZINE OF LITERATURE AND ART (1849-1852). Philadelphia, PA

UNITED STATES CATHOLIC MAGAZINE AND MONTHLY REVIEW (1844-1848). Baltimore, MD

UNITED STATES MAGAZINE & DEMOCRATIC REVIEW (1837-1851) New York, NY   title change to   DEMOCRATIC REVIEW (Jan.–Dec. 1852) New York, NY   title change to   THE UNITED STATES REVIEW (1853-1856) New York, NY   title change to   UNITED STATES DEMOCRATIC REVIEW (1856-1859) New York, NY

UNITED STATES MAGAZINE OF SCIENCE, ART, MANUFACTURES, AGRICULTURE, COMMERCE AND TRADE   (1854-1856) New York, NY   title change to   UNITED STATES MAGAZINE (1856-1857) New York, NY

UNITED STATES SERVICE MAGAZINE (1864-1866) New York, NY

UNIVERSAL REVIEW (1859-1860) London, England

UNIVERSALIST QUARTERLY AND GENERAL REVIEW (1844-1869) Boston, MA

UNIVERSALIST WATCHMAN, REPOSITORY AND CHRONICLE (1831-1847) Woodstock, VT

VALLEY FARMER (1849-1864) St. Louis, MO

VANITY FAIR (1859-1863) New York, NY

VILLAGE RECORD (1860-1867) West Chester, PA

VIRGINIA HISTORICAL REGISTER, AND LITERARY NOTE BOOK (1850-1851) Richmond, VA

WATER-CURE JOURNAL (1845-1861) New York, NY

WELLMAN’S LITERARY MISCELLANY (1849-1851) Detroit, MI

WESLEYAN-METHODIST MAGAZINE (1835-1869) London, England

WESTERN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURE, MANUFACTURES, MECHANIC ARTS, INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT,   COMMERCE, AND GENERAL LITERATURE (1848-1851) St. Louis, MO   title change to   WESTERN JOURNAL AND CIVILIAN; DEVOTED TO AGRICULTURE, MANUFACTURES, MECHANIC ARTS,   INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT, COMMERCE, PUBLIC POLICY, AND POLITE LITERATURE (1851-1856) St. Louis, MO

WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY (1840-1855). Louisville, KY

WESTERN LAW JOURNAL (1843-1853) Cincinnati, OH

WESTERN LITERARY CABINET (1853-1854) Detroit, MI

WESTERN LITERARY MESSENGER. A FAMILY MAGAZINE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, ART, MORALITY, AND   GENERAL INTELLIGENCE ( 1847-1857) Buffalo, NY

WESTERN QUARTERLY REVIEW (1849). Cincinnati, OH

WESTMINSTER REVIEW (1839- 1869) London, England

YALE LITERARY MAGAZINE. CONDUCTED BY THE STUDENTS OF YALE UNIVERSITY (1836-1851) New Haven, CT

YANKEE DOODLE (1846-1847). New York, NY

YEARBOOK OF PHOTOGRAPHY AND PHOTOGRAPHIC NEWS ALMANAC (1864-1869) London, England

YOUNG AMERICA! ORGAN OF THE NATIONAL REFORM ASSOCIATION (1845-1848) New York, NY

YOUTH’S COMPANION (1827-1869) Boston, MA

ZION’S HERALD (1839-1841) Boston, MA   title change to   ZION’S HERALD AND WESLEYAN JOURNAL (1842-1867) Boston, MA   title change to   ZION’S HERALD (1868-1869)

@@@

BELOW ARE A COUPLE OF PAGES TAKEN FROM THE EXISTING FILE – WHICH NEEDS PROOFING – BUT WHICH SHOWS SOMETHING OF THE MATERIALS….

GENESEE FARMER: A MONTHLY JOURNAL DEVOTED TO AGRICULTURE & HORTICULTURE, DOMESTIC AND RURAL ECONOMY (1845-1865) Rochester, NY

Edited by Daniel Lee and D. D. T. Moore. Rochester, NY Publisher and Proprietor.

For the type of publication, profusely illustrated with woodcuts, a very occasional steel engraving tipped –in.

indexed

[1845-1865 all?]

HALL, H. P. (SARATOGA SPRINGS, NY) see also EXHIBITIONS. 1847. NEW YORK STATE FAIR. (GENESEE FARMER, Nov. 1847)

EXHIBITIONS. 1847. SARATOGA. NEW YORK STATE FAIR.

“Premiums Awarded at the New York State Fair, 1847.” GENESEE FARMER 8:11 (Nov. 1847): 262-265. [Awards, organized by classes—“Cattle,” “Fat Cattle,” “Horses,” “Domestic Manufactures,” “Needle, Shell, and Wax Work,” “Flowers,” etc. Discretionary Premiums were awarded to, among others, “…H. P. Hall, Saratoga Springs, Daguerreotype,…” p. 265.]

UNKNOWN. USA. 1849.

1 b & w (“G. Pratt.”) GENESEE FARMER 10:2 (Feb. 1849): frontispiece. [“Engraved by T. I. Roy.” Not credited, but from a daguerreotype.]

MCDONALD, ALEXANDER. (BUFFALO, NY)

“Editor’s Table. Daguerreotypes of Devon Cattle.” GENESEE FARMER 10:4 (Apr. 1849): 96. [“We are indebted to Wm. Garbutt, Esq., of Wheatland, for Daguerreotypes of a pair of four year old Steers, and a two year old Heifer, (Devons,) owned by E. P. Beck, of Sheldon, Wyoming county. The animals represented received the first premium (in each class, as grass fed animals,) at the State Fair at Buffalo, in September last. The “counterfeit presentments” are quite natural and life like, and creditable to the artist— Alex. McDonald, of Buffalo. The likenesses can be seen at our office.”]

EXHIBITIONS. 1849. SYRACUSE, NY. NEW YORK STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY.

“Agricultural Societies. New York State Agricultural Society. Judges on the Premium List”. GENESEE FARMER 10:6 (June 1849): 148. [“At a meeting of the Executive Committee of this Society, held in Syracuse on the 10th of May, the following Judges were appointed for the Annual Show,—to be held in that city on the 11th, 12th and 13th days of September next:—… Animal Paintings, Paintings And Daguerreotypes.— T. R. Walker, Utica; E. P. Prentice, Albany; A. Stevens, New York….”]

BROWN & HOWARD. (ROCHESTER, NY)

[Advertisement.] “Daguerreotypes that are Daguerreotypes.” GENESEE FARMER 11:8 (Aug. 1850): 199. [“Brown & Howard’s Emporium Daguerrean Gallery, No. 9, second floor Gould Buildings. Having opened a splendid Gallery in the Gould Block, would respectfully invite the public and all those wishing good likenesses, to give us a call, and we will assure them they will not waste time and money, as is often the case. Our Gallery is furnished in a style of unusual splendor, equal to any in the State. The walls are adorned with some of the finest works of Art, both of pencil and the engraver. Strangers visiting the city, and having a few leisure hours, will be simply rewarded by a visit to our Gallery, which will be kept open during all business hours. Please call and examine for yourselves. Wm. Brown, John Howard. The undersigned takes this method of informing the citizens of Rochester and vicinity that by the solicitations of many citizens, he has been induced to return to the city for the purpose of making it a place of permanent location. Having been absent from the city for one year, and in constant practice, experimenting in the above named Art, has now returned better qualified than ever, not only to sustain, but to excel my former reputation as an Artist., being well known in this city and vicinity, as formerly principal operator in Mercer’ & Co.’s Gallery, corner of Main and St. Paul streets, would now respectfully invite my old friends, and the public generally, to call on No. 9 Gould Buildings, where you can see likenesses that will speak for themselves. W. Brown.” (This ad ran several times in 1850.)]

UNKNOWN. USA. 1852.

Campbell, George, of West Minister, Vt. “French Merino Sheep.” GENESEE FARMER 13:8 (Aug. 1852): 247-249. 2 b & w. [Illustrated with portraits of two herds of sheep, engraved from daguerreotypes. “I send you a wood cut, engraved from a Daguerreotype, of a group of French sheep imported by Wm. Chamberlain, Esq., of Red Hook, of your state, and myself, one year since…” ]

BOOKS. 1858. see also BY COUNTRY. USA. 1858. (GENESEE FARMER, Sept. 1858)

BY COUNTRY. USA. 1858.

“Notices of Books, Pamphlets, &c.” GENESEE FARMER 19:9 (Sept. 1858): 291. [Book review. The New American Cyclopedia: A Popular Dictionary of General Knowledge. Edited by George Ripley and Charles A. Dana. New York: D. Appleton & Co. 1858. “It is nearlt thirty years since a complete Cyclopedia was published in this country; since that time we have doubled both our population and our area—peopled the Gold Regions—discovered a new Continent—gone through a war—buried our third generation of great Statesmen, in Clay, Calhoun, Webster and Benton—built towns like Chicago, all our Railways, our Ocean Steamers, our Iron Houses (sic Horses]—invented the Photograph, the Electric Telegraph, and the Lightning Press—introduced cheap Postage, steel Pens, gummed Envelopes, Lucifer Matches, Ice, Omnibuses, Chloroform, etc., etc. These matters are all dealt with in this work…”]

UNKNOWN. GREAT BRITAIN. 1860.

“White Sprouting Broccoli.” GENESEE FARMER 21:2 (Feb. 1860): 64-65. 1 b & w. [From London Gardner’s Chronicle. “…The annexed representation of an individual of the present season, and therefore of the fourth generation, engraved from a photograph, will show what the new race has become…”]

UNKNOWN. USA. 1861.

Presbrey, Otis. F. “The Ontario Grape.” GENESEE FARMER 22:4 (Apr. 1861): 121. 1 b & w. [“Eds. Genesee Farmer:–Knowing the interest taken by your journal in Grape culture, I send you for insertion a cut from a photograph of a cluster of the Ontario Grape. This new variety originated in Canada, near Lake Ontario, from which it was named….”]

UNKNOWN. AUSTRIA. 1860.

“The Cultivation of a Grape Vine.” GENESEE FARMER 24:4 (Apr. 1863): 122-123. 1 b & w. [From the Journal d’Agriculture Pratique. Full-page engraving “A Grape Vine, Engraved after a Photograph made at Chateau Mornay (Vienna,) bearing 30 Bunches of Grapes on the ‘Fruit’ Canes and 6 on the ‘Wood’ Canes.”]

BY COUNTRY. USA. 1863.

“Miscellaneous.” GENESEE FARMER 24:9 (Sept. 1863): 288. [“Why are photographers the most uncivil of all trades-people? Because when we make application for a copy of our portrait the always reply with a negative.”]

BY COUNTRY. USA. 1861-1864 (US CIVIL WAR)

[Advertisement.] “Just What Everybody Wants.” GENESEE FARMER 25:3 (May 1864): 99. [Our New Pocket Album. [For Soldier and Civilian.] Holding sixteen pictures, is the cheapest and the best Pocket Album ever offered to the public. Sent by mail to any address, post paid, on receipt of Seventy-five cents. It can be filled with pictures (16) and sent by mail to soldiers in the army, or friends anywhere in Uncles Sam’s dominions, at the very trifiling sum of Thirty Cents postage. Orders promptly filled by Samuel Bowles & Company, Photograph Album Manufacturers, Springfield, Mass.”]

BY COUNTRY. USA. 1865.

[Advertisement.] “100 Photographs of Union Generals.” GENESEE FARMER 26:11 (Nov. 1865): 358. [“…sent postpaid for 25 cents; 100 Photographs of Handsome Ladies for 25 cents; 100 Photographs of Actors for 25 cents; 50 photographs of Rebel Officers for 25 cents. Address C. R. Seymour, Holland, Erie Co., N. Y.”]

ZZZ

GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (1830-1869) London, England

Previous Title(s): the Gentleman’s Magazine: or, Monthly Intellegencer / Jan. 1731-Dec. 1735

Originally Published: London: Chatto & Windus, 1731-1907. The Gentleman’s Magazine: continues the Gentleman’s Magazine: and historical review (1856-1868), the Gentleman’s Magazine: and historical chronicle (1731-1833) and the Gentleman’s Magazine: or monthly intelligencer (1731-1735).

Mitford, John, editor, 1834-1850; Nichols, John Gough, editor, 1851-1856; Parker, John Henry, editor, 1857-1865; Hatton, Joseph, editor, 1868-1873.

Description: 123 v. bill., chart, facsims., maps, plans, plates (part col.), ports., tables. 22cm.

Fearful of losing the lead in technological innovation and industrialization to other European rivals, and under Price Albert’s goading, a major effort was extended throughout Great Britain during the 1850s-1860s to encourage the diffusion of knowledge in the arts and sciences throughout all segments of British society. One facet of this effort was the establishment and growth of numerous organizations or societies, established and fostered by the literate professional classes, and tied to the encouragement of learning in specific disciplines or fields of study. Antiquities research and archaeological studies held an active interest among the educated and leisured class in Britain during the 1850s-1860s. The Gentleman’s Magazine, whose demographic was drawn from this group, became the journal of record for a number of these local and national organizations; which met regularly—often on a monthly schedule. Often the same individuals who perused these studies throughout the 1850s also practiced amateur photography in order to use this vital new tool for their research. The reports of many of these meetings frequently includes notations of the use of photographs for research and reporting of the discoveries in these disciplines, and therefore provides an indicator of the increasing reliance that these sciences placed upon photography.

The journal was reorganized with both a new publisher and a new editor in 1866. “For, whilst The Gentleman’s Magazine will continue to preserve its high antiquarian character, it is the intention of its new managers, in concert with a large circle of able and accomplished friends on whose aid they can rely, to include, as far as may be, matters of present interest, and to secure for its readers all necessary information respecting the chief subjects of the day as they arise. In the New Series a much larger space will be devoted to current literature than has of late years been the case; and its reviews will embrace a wider range of subjects, including not only History, Antiquities, and Architecture, but also Art and Science, Biography, Personal Memoirs, Philology, Music and the Drama, Natural History, and Theology in its uncontroversial aspects. Fiction and Politics alone will be excluded. ‘Svlvanus Urban ‘ also desires to lay open his columns much more extensively than hitherto to Original Correspondence, especially on matters of genealogy, topography, heraldry, local antiquities, personal and family history, folk-lore, philology, &c. ” Increased care will be taken to make the ‘ Monthly Intelligence,” Gazette Appointments,’ &c.,’ Births, Marriages, and Obituary ‘ (including authentic Memoirs), as perfect a record as possible of the changes that are being daily worked by the silent hand of Time among the upper and middle classes of society;…” (Gentleman’s Magazine ns 1 (Jan. 1866): iv.) The effect was to present a more modern magazine, dealing with a larger range of contemporary issues, while retaining much of the concerns and feel of the traditional contents. Reports of the activities of the existing antiquarian and anthropological societies were broadened to include even more organizations. For example, the July 1866 issue devoted eighteen pages of texts to reports of the meetings of twenty-one national and four local societies –ranging from the Royal Asiatic Society to the Zoological Society; from the Royal Society (London) to the Yorkshire Philosophical Society and including such diverse interests as Astronomy, Horticulture, Literature, Geology, Geography, Numismatics, and Statistics. In fact, a major new contributor publicly proclaimed a sustained amateur interest in photography, and he always included information about photography in his new column, “Scientific Notes of the Month”as well as publishing several well-informed articles which display the reach and impact of the medium on contemporary society.

In 1868 the magazine was revamped again, following guidelines set down in its “Preface” “…But if the man who is not educating himself to the last hour of his life is a fool, the magazine whose life has doubled the allotted span of man’s, will, in refusing to obey the signs of the times which it records, display that which is not wisdom. It is no longer desirable, it is indeed scarcely possible, for a monthly magazine to comprise the features which, when periodical literature was scant and bad, the promoters of The Gentleman’s Magazine not unsuccessfully sought to present. Politics, Science, Art, have been beckoned to more removed ground, each has its many able organs, and each requires a diffuseness and an exactitude which are impossible in a miscellany…. The learned societies are admirably attended to by learned editors with special endowments, and that department of literature which is called criticism is represented almost to excess. Therefore we abandon work which we could not perform to advantage. But we believe that we see plenty of other work ready to our hand….” (entirely new series vol. 1 (June 1868): 2-3.)

From the 1850s on the Gentleman’s Magazine was well-illustrated, usually by engravings from drawings of archeological items or topographical views of architectural structures. These illustrations were occasionally credited to be from photographic sources. As the editors prided themselves in the accuracy of their scientific renderings and they wished to duplicate the original artist’s work with the least amount of transcription distortions from drawing to engraving; the magazine used early photoengraving techniques as soon as they became available in the early 1860s in order to reproduce some or all of these hand-drawn illustrations. By the end of the decade, shifts in editorial policy to popularize the magazine had decreased this emphasis and more general illustrations began to appear, including even some narrative scenes or portraits to illustrate fictional stories.

Two vols. per year. Volume numbers never given in the magazine, and often applied erratically in the volume title page, so I have just used the date, which was always on the title-page of the issue.)

indexed

vol. 100 (Jan 1830) – vol. 103 (Dec. 1833)

ns vol. 1 (Jan. 1834) – ns vol. 45 (June 1856)

vol. 201 (July 1856) – vol. 207 (Dec. 1859)

vol. 208 (Jan. 1860) – vol. 219 (Dec. 1865)

ns vol. 1 (Jan. 1866) – ns vol. 3 (Jan. –May 15, 1868) [vol. 224 (May 1868)]

entirely ns 1 (June – Nov. 1868) ns 2 (Dec. 1868 —  May 1869) –entirely ns 3 (June –Nov. 1869) [vol. 225 — vol. 227.] (Dec. 1869)

 

1832

DAGUERRE.

“Literary and Scientific Intelligence. The Diorama, Regent’s Park.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (July 1832): 63-64. [“The Diorama has opened with two new views—a landscape and an interior. The former is of Paris, taken from the heights of Montmartre, and has been painted by Daguerre with fidelity and care, but without any aim at fine effect. In the foreground, however, the windmills of Montmartre are painted with great power. The second view ii of a gallery in the singular and celebrated Campo Santo at Pisa. ‘The Campo Santo is an enclosure planted with Cyprus trees and myrtles, surrounded by sixty arcades of white and black marble, horizontally laid, and forming a rectangular parallelogram. Its longest sides are erected on twenty-seven pillars, and admit the light through semicircular arches in the galleries, which are ornamented with paintings in fresco, upon sacred subjects, by the oldest Tuscan masters, and are further adorned by upwards of 600 sepulchral monuments, belonging to the most illustrious families in Pisa, and by magnificent sarcophagi, mostly of Parian marble, brought from Constantinople and Greece, besides a great number of other interesting monuments.’ It is one of those long galleries that the present picture represents; the heavy beams of its roof are uncovered; through the orifices in one of its walls the light is admitted; on the opposite one are the fresco paintings; below, and along each side, are arranged the monuments and relics of antiquity. The painting of this curious subject is by Bouton.”]

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Domestic Occurrences. Alphabetical List of the New House of Commons, Appointed to Meet Jan. 29, 1833. England and Wales.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE. (Dec. 1832): Supplement pp. 641-643. [“…All those places marked thus *, being forty-two in number, are newly-created Boroughs. Where there are two or more Members, they are placed according to the order in which they stood on the poll at the time of election. …Chippenham — —J. Neeld, W. H. F. Talbot….”]

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Domestic Occurrences. Promotions, Preferements, &c. Marriages.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE. (Dec. 1832): Supplement p. 644. [“…Dec… 20. At All Souls, Langham-place, Henry Fox Talbot, esq. M.P. of Lacock Abbey, co. Wilts, to Constance, youngest dau. of F. Mundv, esq. of Markeaton, co. Derby….”]

1835

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Domestic Occurrences. Births.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE. (June 1835): 654. [“…Apr.   25. In Sackville street, the wife of H. Fox Talbot, esq., of Lacock Abbey, Wilts., a dau.–…”]

1836

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Literary and Scientific Intelligence. Royal Society.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE. (Apr. 1836): 411. [“March 10. F. Bailey, esq. Treas. V.P. Edw. John Johnson, esq. Commander R.N. was elected Fellow. Read, Researches on the Integral Calculus, by Henry Fox Talbot, esq.; and Report of Magnetic Experiments tried on board a steam vessel, made by order of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, by Commander E. J. Johnson, R.N….”]

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Literary and Scientific Intelligence. British Association for the Advancement of Science.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Oct. 1836): 409-413. [“…Section A, for Mathematical and Physical Science… Thursday, Aug. 25… On the Integral Calculus, by H. Fox Talbot, esq.;…” p. 409.]

1837

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Literary and Scientific Intelligence. Royal Society.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE. (Jan. 1837): 78. [“…Nov. 30. This was the anniversary meeting; his Royal Highness the Duke of Sussex, Pres. in the chair…. The election of Council and officers for the ensuing year then took place:—… Other Members of the Council.—G. B. Airy, esq. A.M.; W. Allen, Esq.; J. Bostock, M.D.; the Earl of Burlington; S. H. Christie, esq.; Vise. Cole, M.P.; J. H. Green, esq.; G. B. Greenough, esq.; W. Lawrence, esq.; J. Lindley, Ph.D.; J. W. Lulibock, esq. M.A.; Rev. G. Peacock, M.A.; W. Hasledine Pepys, esq.; Rev. A. Sedgwick, M.A.; W. H. Smyth, Capt. R.N.; W. H. Fox Talbot, esq.” “…Dec. 15. W. Lawrence, esq. in the chair. A paper was read, entitled, “Further Observations on the Optical Phenomena of Crystals,” by W. H. F. Talbot, esq.”]

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Births and Marriages. Births.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE. (Apr. 1837): 423. [“….Mar.    16 …, the wife of H. Fox Talbot, esq., of Lacock Abbey, Wilts., a dau.–…”]

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Obituary. Rear-Admiral Fielding.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE. (Oct. 1837): 425. [“Sept. 2. At Richmond, aged 57, Rear- Admiral Charles Fielding, R.N. He was a great-grandson of Basil fourth Earl of Denbigh, being the only son of Commodore Charles Fielding, R. N. (younger son of Col. The Hon. Charles Fielding, brother to William fifth Earl), by Frances, daughter of the Rt. Hon. William Finch, and sister to George Earl of Winchelsea and Nottingham. He attained post rank in the West Indies, Jan. 15, 1802; and returned home in the Andromeda frigate on the 24th Sept. following. He subsequently commanded the Circe of 28 guns, which was wrecked on the Lemon and Ower, whilst in chase of an enemy, Nov. 16, 1803. His next appointment was to the Sea Fencibles at Queenborough; and he afterwards commanded the Revolutionnaire frigate. He was promoted to the rank of Rear-Admiral in the present year. He married, April 24, 1804, Lady Elizabeth-Theresa, widow of William Davenport Talbot, esq. of Lacock Abbey, Wilts, and sister to the present Earl of Ilchester and the Marchioness of Lansdowne. By that lady, who survives him (and who was mother, by her first marriage, of the present William Henry Fox Talbot, esq. F.R.S. of Lacock Abbey, late M.P. for Chippenham) he had issue two daughters: 1. The Right Hon. Caroline Viscountess Valletort, who was married in 1831 to Ernest-Augustus Viscount Valletort, heir apparent to the Earl of Mount-Edgcumbe, and has issue a son and heir, born in 1832; and 2. Horatia, who is unmarried.”]

1838

BREWSTER, SIR DAVID. see also HERSCHEL, SIR JOHN. (GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE, Oct. 1838)

WHEATSTONE, PROF. see also HERSCHEL, SIR JOHN. (GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE, Oct. 1838)

HERSCHEL, SIR JOHN.

“Literary and Scientific Intelligence. British Association for the Advancement of Science.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Oct. 1838): 419 -431. [“The Eighth meeting of this Association was opened at Newcastle on Saturday the 18th of August. The Earl of Burlington, the President of last year, being absent on the continent, Professor Whewell, V. P. took the chair; when the Secretary, the Rev. J. Yates, read the Report of the Council. …The following list of the officers of sections, recommended by the Council, was approved of by the meeting:— Section A.—Mathematics and Physics; meeting in the Lecture-room of the Philosophical Society. President, Sir John Herschel; Vice-Presidents, Sir David Brewster, Sir William Hamilton, Rev. Dr. Robinson, and Mr. F. Baily, Secretaries, Major Sabine, Rev. Professor Chevalier, and Professor Stevelly…. Sir John Herschel laid before the Section, — 1. ” Reduced Observations of 1232 Nebulae and Clusters of Stars, made in the years 1834, 5, G, 7, 8, at the Cape of Good Hope, with the 20-feet reflector; 2. Reduced Observations of 1192 Double Stars of the Southern Hemisphere; 3. Micrometrical Measures of 407 principal Double Stars of the Southern Hemisphere, made at the Cape, with a 7-fect achromatic equatorial telescope; 4. A list of the approximate places of 15 Planetary and Annular Nebulae of the Southern Hemisphere, discovered with the 20-feet reflector; and 5. Drawings illustrative of the appearance and structure of:i principal Nebulee in the Southern Hemisphere.”… Wednesday… Sir David Brewster read a paper on some Preparations of the Eye, by Mr. Clay Wallace, of New York; and another on a new kind of Polarity in Homogeneous Light, by himself; Sir W. R. Hamilton made a communication relative to the Propagation of Light in vacua; Sir J. Herschel, a Note on the structure of the vitreous humour of the Eye of the Shark; and Mr. Ball, of C. C. Cambr. a paper, On the meaning of the arithmetical symbols for Zero and Unity, when used in general symbolical algebra…. Thursday. On Subterranean Temperature; and a notice of a Brine Spring, near Kissingten, Bavaria, which emits carbonic acid gas, by Prof. Forbes; A description of a Substitute for the Mountain Barometer in measuring Heights, by Sir John Robison; A communication respecting Halley’s Comet, by Sir John Herschel; On a new phenomenon of colour in certain specimens of Fluor Spar, by Sir D. Brewster; On the Helm Wind of Crossfell, by the Rev. J. Watson; On the variation of the quantities of Rain which falls in different pads of the Earth, by Dr. Smith; On Binocular Vision, and on the Stereoscope, an instrument for illustrating its phenomena, by Prof. Wheatstone (whose invention was highly commended by Sir D. Brewster and Sir John Herschel); and on a general Geometric Method, by the Rev. Charles Graves, F.T.C.D….…. Friday… four distinct papers on Vision, Light, and Diffraction, by Sir D. Brewster,…”]

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Literary and Scientific Intelligence. New Publications. Antiquities.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Nov. 1838): 526. [Book notice. Hermes; or, Classical and Antiquarian Researches. By H. F. Talbot, esq….”]

1839

HENRY FOX.

“Literary and TALBOT, WILLIAM Scientific Intelligence. Royal Society.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Jan. 1839): 80. [“…Nov. 30. The anniversary meeting took place, when the Marquis of Northampton was elected President, (vice the Duke of Sussex; resigned); John William Lubbock, eta,. M. A. Treasurer…; H.R.H. The Duke of Sussex, … Thomas Graham, esq., Sir John F. W. Herschel, bart. M.A.,…., and Rev. Robert Willis, M.A., Members of the Council. (The names printed in Italics, were not members of the last Council.) A Copley medal was awarded to M. Faraday, esq., and another to Prof. Gauss of Gottingen; the Rumford medal to Professor Forbes; and the Royal Medals to H. Fox Talbot, esq. and Professor Graham….”]

DAGUERRE.

“Fine Arts. The Daguerotype.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Feb. 1839): 185-186. [“A very extraordinary and important Invention has been made by M. Daguerre, one of the painters of the Diorama. It is a method of fixing the images which are represented at the back of a camera-obscura; so that these images are not the temporary reflection of objects, but their fixed and durable impress, which may be removed from the presence of those objects like a picture, and will multiply impressions as an engraving. M. Daguerre requires a plate of polished metal; he places it in his apparatus, and, in three minutes, if there is a bright summer sun, and a few more, if autumn or winter weaken the power of its beams, he takes it out, covered with a charming design, representing the object towards which the apparatus was turned. Nothing remains but a short chemical operation, and the design, which has been obtained in so few moments, remains unalterably fixed, so that the hottest sun cannot destroy it. The invention has been submitted to M. Arago, and he has made a report upon it to the Academy of Sciences, from which the following are extracts: “In the camera-obscura the image is perfectly defined when the lens is achromatic; the same precision is seen in the images obtained by M. Daguerre, which represent all objects with a degree of perfection which no designer, however skilful, can equal, and finished, in all the details, in a manner that exceeds belief. It is the light which forms the image, on a plate covered with a particular coating. The length of time required to execute this operation is, in our climate, and in ordinary weather, eight or ten minutes; but, under a pure sky, like that of Egypt, two, perhaps one minute, might suffice to execute the most complex design. “M. Daguerre has found a substance infinitely more sensible to the light than the chlorure of silver, which is altered in an inverse manner, that is to say, which leaves on the several parts of the plate, corresponding to the several parts of the object, dark tints for the shadowy, half tints for the lighter parts, and no tint whatever for the parts that are quite luminous. When this action of the light on the different parts of the plate has produced the desired effect, M. Daguerre stops it at once, and the design, which he withdraws from the camera-obscura, may be exposed to the full light of day without undergoing any alteration. “If we consider M. Daguerre’s discovery with respect to the utility which it may have in the sciences, it is evident that so sensible a re-agent as that which he has found, may enable us to make photometrical experiments, which have hitherto been reputed impossible. Such,” said M. Arago, ” are experiments on the light of the moon; which the Academy bad deemed of sufficient importance for it to appoint a committee, composed of M. de Laplace, M. Mains, and myself, to make them. The light of the moon is known to be 300,000 times weaker than that of the sun; yet we did not despair of obtaining some sensible effects, by means of a lens of very large dimensions. We made use of a very large lens, brought from Austria; and having placed some chlorure of silver in the focus, that being the most sensible re-agent known, not the slightest discolouration was perceptible. It occurred to me, that M. Daguerre might have more success with his new reagent; and, in fact, he obtained, in twenty minutes, on his dark ground, a white image of the moon, with a lens far less powerful than ours.” M. Biot has also added his testimony to the value of this discovery to the philosopher; and the celebrated artist, M. Paul Delaroche, has expressed his opinions that views taken in this manner, though destitute of colour, may give useful hints to the most skilful painters, in the manner of expressing by light and shade, not only the relief of objects, but the local tint; the same bas-relief in plaster and in marble will be differently represented in the two designs, and one can tell, at the first glance, which is the image of the plaster. The smallest folds of drapery are perceptible, as are the lines of a landscape invisible to the naked eye. With the aid of a glass we bring the distances near. In the mass of buildings, of accessories, of imperceptible traits, which compose a view of Paris taken from the Pont des Arts, we distinguish the smallest details; we count the paving stones; we see the humidity caused by the rain; we read the inscription on a shop sign. The effect becomes more astonishing if a microscope is employed. An insect of the size of a pea, the garden spider, enormously magnified by a solar microscope, is reflected in the same dimensions by the marvellous mirror, and with the most minute accuracy. It is manifest how useful M. Daguerre’s discovery will be in the study of natural history. In one instance three views of the same monument are taken; one in the morning, one at noon, and the other in the evening; and nobody will mistake the effect of the morning for that of the evening, though the sun’s altitude, and, consequently, the relative lengths of the shadows, are the same in both.”]

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Literary and Scientific Intelligence. Royal Society.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Mar. 1839): 294-296. [“Jan. 31. J. W. Lubbock, esq. V.P. and Treas. in the chair. John Wesley Williams, esq. and James Yates, esq. were elected Fellows of the Society. The paper read was entitled ‘ Some account of the Art of Photogenic Drawing,’ by H. F. Talbot, esq. F.R.S. In this communication, the author states, that during the last four or five years .he has invented and brought to a considerable degree of perfection a process for copying the forms of natural objects by means of solar light, which is received upon paper previously prepared in a particular manner. He observes, that a prior attempt of this kind is recorded in the Journal of the Royal Institution for 1802; by which it appears, that the idea was originally suggested by Mr. Wedgwood, and afterward experimented on by Sir Humphry Davy. These philosophers found, that their principle, though theoretically true, yet failed in practice, on account of certain difficulties; the two principal of which were—first, that the paper could not be rendered sufficiently sensible to receive any impression whatever from the feeble light of a camera obscura; and secondly, that the pictures which were formed by the solar rays could not be preserved, owing to their still con- tinning to be acted upon by the light, Mr. Talbot states, that his experiments were begun without his being aware of this prior attempt; and that in the course of them he discovered methods of overcoming the two difficulties above related. With respect to the latter, he says, that he has found it possible, by a subsequent process, so to fix the images or shadows formed by the solar rays, that they become insensible to light, and consequently admit of being preserved during any length of time: as an example of which he mentions, that he has exposed some of his pictures to the sunshine for the space of an hour without injury. With respect to the other point, he states that he has succeeded in discovering a method of preparing the paper, which renders it much more sensitive to light than any which had been used previously, and by means of which he finds that there is no difficulty in fixing the pictures given by the camera obscura and by the solar microscope. In the summer of 1835 he made a great number of portraits of a house in the country, of ancient architecture (his own residence, Lacock Abbey), several of which he exhibited to the Society. After some speculations on the possibility of discovering a yet more sensitive paper, the author mentions, that the kind employed by him may be rendered so much so, as to become visibly affected by the full light of the sun in the space of half a second. The rest of this paper contains an account of various other ways in which this method may be employed in practice, according to the kind of object which it is required to copy; also, a brief mention of the great variety of effects resulting from comparatively small differences in the mode of preparing the paper; and of certain anomalies which occur in the process, the cause of which has not hitherto been rendered distinctly manifest. From this paper it appears that Mr. Talbot’s researches have brought him to a discovery almost identical with that of M. Daguerre, of which we gave some particulars in our last Number, p. 185. (We may here mention that we were not correct in one particular; M. Daguerre’s plates are mere pictures, not engravings.)” pp. 294-295.  “Feb. 21. J. G. Children, esq. V.P. Captain Arthur Conolly, and Lieut-Col. W. Reid, C.B. were elected Fellows. Three papers were read: 1. ‘An account of the processes used in Photogenic Draw, ing,’ by H. Fox Talbot, esq. F.R.S.; 2. ‘A description of an Hydropneumatic Baroscope,’ by J. T. Cooper, esq.; 3. The continuation of Mr. Darwin’s paper on the Parallel Roads of Glen Roy and other parts of Lochabar. In Mr. Talbot’s second paper, he has disclosed the whole of his interesting secret, with regard to the two important points, the preparation of photogenic paper, and the means of fixing the design. The paper selected for the purpose is of good quality and smooth, surface. Mr. Talbot dips it into a weak solution of common salt, and wipes it dry, by which the salt is uniformly distributed throughout its substance. He then spreads a solution of nitrate of silver on one surface only, and dries it at the fire. The solution should not be saturated, but six or eight times diluted with water. When dry, the paper is fit for use. He his found, by experiment, that there is a certain proportion between the quantity of salt and that of the solution of silver which answers best, and gives the maximum effect. If a sheet of paper, thus prepared, be taken and washed with a saturated solution of salt, and then dried, it will be found (especially if the paper has been kept some weeks before the trial is made) that its sensibility is greatly diminished, and, in some cases, seems quite extinct. But if it be again washed with a liberal quantity of the solution of silver, it becomes again sensible to light, and even more so than it was at first. In this way, by alternately washing the paper with salt and silver, and drying it between times, Mr. Talbot has succeeded in increasing its sensibility to the degree that is requisite for receiving the images of the camera obscure. With regard to the second object—that of fixing the images—Mr. Talbot observed, that, after having tried ammonia, and several other re-agents, with very imperfect success, the first which gave him a successful result, was the iodide of potassium, much diluted with water. If a photogenic picture is washed over with this liquid, an iodide of niter is formed, which is absolutely unalterable by sunshine. This process requires precaution: for, if the solution is too strong, it attacks the dark parts of the picture. It is requisite, therefore, to find, by trial, the proper proportions. The fixation of the pictures in this way, with proper management, is very beautiful and lasting. The specimen of lace, which Mr. Talbot exhibited to the Society, and which was made five years ago, was preserved in this manner. But his usual method of fixing is different from this, and somewhat simpler—or, at least, requiring less nicety. It consists in immersing the picture in a strong solution of common salt, and then wiping off the superfluous moisture, and drying it. It is sufficiently singular that the same substance which is so useful in giving sensibility to the paper, should also be capable, under other circumstances, of destroying it; bet such is, nevertheless, the fact. Now, if the picture which has been thus washed and dried, is placed in the mm, the white parts colour themselves of a pale lilac tint, after which they become insensible. Numerous experiments have shown the author that the depth of this lilac tint varies according to the quantity of salt used, relatively to the quantity of silver: but by properly adjusting these, the images may, if desired, be retained of an absolute whiteness. He mentions, also, that those preserved by iodine are always of a very pale primrose yellow, which has the extraordinary and very remarkable property of turning to a full gaudy yellow, whenever it is exposed to the beat of a fire, and recovering its former colour again, when it is cold.” pp. 295-296.]

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX. see also HERSCHEL, SIR JOHN. (GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE, Apr. 1839)

HERSCHEL, SIR JOHN.

“Literary and Scientific Intelligence. Royal Society.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Apr. 1839): 413. [“…March 14. J. W. Lubbock, esq. V.P. … Read, 1. An experimental Inquiry into the formation of Alkaline and Earthy bodies, with reference to their presence in plants, the influence of carbonic acid in their generation, and the equilibrium of this gas in the atmosphere, by Robert Rigg, esq.; 2. Note on the art of Photography, or the application of the chemical rays of light to the purposes of pictorial representation, by Sir John F. W. Herschel, Bart. The subject was discussed in its chemical relations; and, after noticing various promising experiments, the writer states that confining his attention, in the first instance, to the employment of chloride of silver, he proceeded to inquire into the methods by which the blackened traces can be preserved. This may be effected, he observes, by the application of any liquid capable of dissolving and washing off the unchanged chloride, but of leaving the reduced, or oxide of silver, untouched. These conditions are best fulfilled by the liquid hyposulphites. Pure water will fix the photograph, by washing out the nitrate of silver, but the tint of the picture resulting is brick-red; but the black colour may be restored, by washing it over with a weak solution of hyposulphite of ammonia. The author found that paper impregnated with the chloride of silver was only slightly susceptible to the influence of light; but an accidental observation led him to the discovery of other salts of silver, in which the acid, being more volatile, adheres to the base by a weak affinity, and which impart much greater sensibility to the paper on which they are applied—such as the carbonate, the nitrate, and the acetate. The nitrate requires to be perfectly neutral; for the least excess of acid lower*, in a remarkable degree, its susceptibility. In the application of photographic processes to the copying of engravings or drawing, many precautions are required. In the first transfers, both light and shadow, <is well as right and left, are the reverses of the original; and to operate a second transfer, or by a double inversion to reproduce the original effect, is a matter of great difficulty. He noticed a curious phenomenon respecting the action of light on nitrated paper; namely, its great increase of intensity under a certain kind of glass strongly pressed in contact with it it —an effect which cannot be explained either by the reflection of light, or the presence of moisture, but which may possibly be dependant on the evolution of heat. Twenty-three specimens of photographs made by Sir John Herschell accompanied this paper; one a sketch of his telescope at Slough, fixed from its image in a lens, and the rest copies of engravings and drawings, some reverse, or first transfers, and others second transfers, or re-reversed pictures.” “March 21. The President in the chair. Read, An account of the fall of a meteoric star, on the 13th of October last; An account of a barometer constructed by S. B. Hewlett, esq.; And a further communication from H. T. Talbot, esq. F. S. A. describing a new kind of sensitive paper for photogenic drawing. Mr. Talbot mentioned, in his memoir read lately before the Society, he had omitted to give the details of a method by which etchings on copper might be successfully imitated. This may be done by covering a sheet of glass with a solution of resin in turpentine, and afterwards smoking it by the flame of a candle; and upon the blacked surface the drawing is made with a needle, or other fine-pointed instrument. A sheet of the sensitive paper being placed under it, a perfect copy is obtained.”]

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Domestic Occurrences. Births.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Apr. 1839): 427-428. [“…Feb. … 24. In Queen Ann st. The wife of H. E. Talbot, esq. of Lacock Abbey, a dau….” p. 428.]

DAGUERRE.

“Foreign News. France.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Apr. 1839): 424-425. [“The result of the elections in France having been decidedly against the Ministers, they all resigned, and Marshal Soult was sent for by the King, and entrusted with the power to negotiate with the Coalition…” “…A fire broke out in the Paris Diorama on the 8th March; and, notwithstanding an abundant supply of water, it was soon evident that there was no chance of stopping the force of the conflagration. The paintings on exhibition were the Sermon, the Temple of Solomon, and the Valley of Golclau, which, with another nearly ready to be put up, were all destroyed. A wall, eighty feet high, fell on the buildings of a waggon-office, burying in a cloud of dust and smoke three firemen who were on the roof. Two of them came out of the ruins unhurt; but a third had his leg broken, and a waggon-man was wounded at the same time. The fire is supposed to have originated in the room called the Salle de Boulevart, where M. Daguerre was preparing another painting for exhibition, representing the interior of the church of Santa Maria Maggiora. Notwithstanding all the exertions made, three houses adjoining the Diorama were partially destroyed. This disaster will impede M. Daguerre’s experiments on his new discovery.”]

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Literary and Scientific Intelligence. New Publications. Divinity.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (May 1839): 523. [Book notice. The Antiquity of the book of Genesis, illustrated by some new Arguments. By H. Fox Talbot, Esq., F. R. S.”]

HAVELL, J. F. & WILLMORE.

“Fine Arts. The Photogenic Art.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (June 1839): 631. [“Mr. J. F. Havell and Mr. Willmore (engravers) have, by covering glass with etching ground and smoke, sketched designs upon it. Through the glass thus exposed by the scratch, the photogenic paper receives the light, and the design, which the sun may be said to print, may be multiplied with perfect identity! The size of designs thus produced need no longer be kept down by that of the printing-press, as the glass can alone limit the size of the design. It is reported that Mr. Havell and his brother have succeeded in giving same true colours, also, to their productions, by the action of light. Beautiful imitations of washed bistre drawings may be produced by slopping out the light on the glass by black varnish, which will obstruct the transmission of light in proportion to the thickness with which the varnish is laid on; and specimens like fine mezzotinto prints have been produced by this process.”]

BY COUNTRY. 1839.

Jackson & Chatto. “Treatise on Wood Engraving.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Aug. 1839): 107-125 . 9 illus.[(Background.) Book review . A Treatise on Wood Engraving, Historical and Practical. With upwards of three hundred Illustrations, engraved on wood. By John Jackson, Royal 8vo. pp. 750.]

DAGUERRE.

“Fine Arts. The Daguerrotype” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Sept. 1839): 289-290. [“We have given as full an account as our space would allow of the progress of the Photogenic art, both in France and England. In our Feb. number,* (* In page 185, near the foot of the first column, erase the words, “and will multiply impressions as an engraving.”) p. 185, is an abstract of M. Arago’s first memoir, read before the Academy of Sciences at Paris, on the invention of M. Daguerre. Since that period the invention has been purchased by the French Government; a yearly pension of (6000 francs having been settled on M. Daguerre, and another of 4000 francs on M. Niepce, the son of the gentleman (deceased) by whose experiments the invention was originally suggested. On the 19th Aug. M. Arago at length divulged the secret in a very crowded meeting of the Academic des Sciences. The process is as follows: a plate of copper thinly coated with silver is washed with a solution of nitric acid, for the purpose of cleansing its surface, and especially to remove the minute traces of copper, which the layer of silver may contain. This washing must be done with the greatest care, attention, and regularity. M. Daguerre has observed, that better results are obtained from copper plated with silver, than from pure silver; whence it may be surmised, that electricity may be concerned in the action. After this preliminary preparation, the metallic plate is exposed, in a well-closed box, to the action of the vapour of iodine, with certain precautions. A small quantity of iodine is placed at the bottom of the box, with a thin gauze between it and the plate, as it were, to sift the vapour, and to diffuse it equally. It is also necessary to surround the plate with a small metallic frame, to prevent the vapour of iodine from condensing in larger quantities round the margin than in the centre; the whole success of the operation depending on the perfect uniformity of the layer of ioduret of silver thus formed. The exact time to withdraw the sheet of plated copper from the vapour, is indicated by the plate assuming a yellow colour. M. Dumas, who has endeavoured to ascertain the thickness of this deposit, states that it cannot be more than the millionth part of a millimetre. The plate thus prepared is placed in the dark chamber of the camera dbscura, and preserved with great care from the faintest action of light. It is, in fact, so sensitive, that exposure for a tenth of a second is more than sufficient to make impression on it. At the bottom of the dark chamber, which M. Daguerre has reduced to small dimensions, is a plate of ground glass, which advances or recedes until the image of the object to be represented is perfectly clear and distinct. When this is gained, the prepared plate is substituted for the ground glass, and receives the impression of the object. The effect is produced in a very short time. When the metallic plate is withdrawn, the impression is hardly to be seen, the action of a second vapour being necessary to bring it out distinctly: the vapour of mercury is employed for this purpose. It is remarkable, that the metallic plate, to be properly acted upon by the mercurial vapour, must be placed at a certain angle. To this end, it is enclosed in a third box, at the bottom of which is placed a small dish filled with mercury. If the picture is to be viewed in a vertical position, as is usually the case with engravings, it must receive the vapour of mercury at an angle of about 45″. If, on the contrary, it is to be viewed at that angle, the plate must be arranged in the box in a horizontal position. The volatilization of the mercury must be assisted by a temperature of 60° of Reaumur (or 167° of Fahrenheit). After these three operations, for the completion of the process, the plate must be plunged into a solution of hypo-sulphite of soda. This solution acts most strongly on the parts which have been uninfluenced by light j the reverse of the mercurial vapour, which attacks exclusively that portion which has been acted on by the rays of light. From this it might perhaps be imagined, that the lights are formed by the amalgamation of the silver with mercury, and the shadows by the sulphuret of silver formed by the hypo-sulphite. M. Arago, however, formally declared the positive inability of the combined wisdom of physical, chemical, and optical science, to offer any theory of these delicate and complicated operations, which might be even tolerably rational and satisfactory. The picture now produced is washed in distilled water, to give it that stability which is necessary to its bearing exposure to light without undergoing any further change. The art of fixing the colours of objects has not hitherto been accomplished; and another important desideratum is, the means of rendering the picture unalterable by friction. The substance of the pictures executed by the Daguerrotype is, in fact, so little solid—is so slightly deposited on the surface of the metallic plate, that the least friction destroys it, like a drawing in chalk: and at present, it is necessary to cover it with glass.”]

DAGUERRE.

J. R. “The Historian Gibbon.—His Autobiography.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Nov. 1839): 465-482. [“…In respect to Carnot, Lord Brougham particularly refers to the “Eloge Historique de Carnot,” by M. Arago, which, however, from its professed purpose, can hardly be an impartial record. Yet, with the exception of the two circumstances, which, like Nelson’s abberrations at Naples, are indelible spots on his life, he was fully entitled to the high praise bestowed on him by the distinguished academician who, like Footenelle and Bailly, accumulate and so ably executes such a variety of scientific functions. Of this eminent man, whom I have heard, both at the Chamber of Deputies, and the Institute, I recollect a saying, generally allusive to those who” write and do not publish, but especially pointed «t his colleague, M. Royer Collard, the chief of the Doctrinaires, who has seldom appeared in print, though known to have composed much, ” Je n’aime point les auteurs en poche.” His recent “Eloge Historique” of Watts is an admirable homage to our great countryman, while he does not appear quite so equitable in adjudicating the respective claims of England and France to the photographic discovery, as his Report to the Chamber of Deputies in support of a demand for pensions to M. Daguerre and M. Niepce, may show. At an after period, Carnot published his own defence:—Response de L. N. M. Carnot au Rapport de J. C. Dallieul. Paris, an. 6 (1798).* (*I cannot conceive a more appropriate designation for our national Bard than that of “The Photographic Painter of Nature;” to borrow an image and apply it in analogy of character, to Nature’s best interpreter, from the great discovery, Which, like him, traces with unerring delicacy of transcript, and perfect accuracy of delineation, her minutest, and, to the ordinary eye, imperceptible workings.”]

DAGUERRE.

“Literary and Scientific Intelligence. New Publications. Fine Arts” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Nov. 1839): 521. [Book notice. History and Description of the Processes of the Daguerreotype and Diorama, illustrated with Plates by the Author, M. Daguerre, with M. Arago’s Report to the Chamber of Deputies. Translated by John S. Memes, LL.D. 8vo. 3s. 6d.]

1840

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Promotions, Preferments, &c. Sheriffs Appointed For 1840.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Mar. 1840): 312. [“…Wilts-W. H. F. Talbot, Lacock Abbey, esq….”]

HERSCHEL, SIR JOHN.

“Literary and Scientific Intelligence. Royal Society.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Apr. 1840): 407. [“…Feb. 27. The Marq. of Northampton, Pres.—William Jory Henwood, esq. was elected Fellow.—A paper was partly read, entitled, On the chemical action of the rays of the Solar Spectrum on preparations of Silver, and other substances, both metallic and non-metallic; and on some Photographic processes; by Sir John F. W. Herschel, Bart….”]

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Miscellaneous Reviews.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (June. 1840): 622. [Book review. Hermes; or, Classical and Antiquarian Researches. By Henry Fox Talbot, Esq. F.R.S. 1838.— The Antiquity of the Book of Genesis. By the same. 1839.—The former of these works contains some very curious and learned disquisitions and ingenious conjectures on the origin of various words and names in the Latin language. The object of the latter is to show that the knowledge of the book of Genesis existed among nations that are commonly believed to have been ignorant of it, especially the Phrygians. We have received both pleasure and instruction from it, and we recommend both these tracts to the consideration of scholars.

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Literary and Scientific Intelligence. Horticultural Society.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (June 1840): 630. [“…Both Reports were unanimously adopted; and the meeting then proceeded to the election of officers for the ensuing year, when his Grace the Duke of Devonshire was re-elected President, T. Edgar, Esq. Treasurer, and G. Bentham, Esq. Secretary; and E. Foster, Esq. J. Rogers, Jan. Esq. and W. H. F. Talbot, Esq. were elected into the Council, in the room of Sir O. Mosley, Bart. E. Barnard, Esq. and H. Bevan, Esq. retiring.”]

1841

BIOT. see also HERSCHEL, SIR JOHN.. (GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE, Jan. 1841)

WHEATSTONE, PROF. see also HERSCHEL, SIR JOHN.. (GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE, Jan. 1841)

HERSCHEL, SIR JOHN..

“Literary and Scientific Intelligence. Royal Society.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Jan. 1841): 78. [“The following distribution of medals took place at the Anniversary Meeting on the 30th Nov.—One of the royal medals was awarded to Sir John F. W. Herschel, Bart. V.P.R.S., for his paper, entitled, “On the Chemical Action of Rays of the Solar Spectrum, on preparations of Silver and other substances, both metallic and non-metallic, and on some Photogenic Processes,” published in the Philosophical Transactions for 1840. The other royal medal was awarded to Charles Wheatstone, Esq. F.R.S., for his paper, entitled, “Contributions to the Physiology of Vision,” published in the Philosophical Transactions for 1838. The Rumford medal was awarded to M. Biot, of Paris, For. Mem. R. S., for his researches in and connected with the Circular Polarization of Light….”]

HAVELL, JOHN. (d. 1841)

“Deaths.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Mar. 1841): 327-335. [“…Mr. John Havell, the engraver, who has been long a respected and distinguished member of his profession. On the first announcement of Daguerre’s discovery, Mr. Havell was so forcibly struck by the photogenic effects, that he applied himself with much assiduity to effect improvements on the discovery. With a view of exhibiting some successful experiments he invited to his house a limited circle of friends, in the midst of whom he was surprised by the fearful visitation of the loss of his reason, which he never fully recovered.”]

HUNT, ROBERT.

“New Publications. Fine Arts.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (July 1841): 73. [Book notice. Popular Treatise on the Art of Photography, including Daguerreotype, and all the New Methods of producing Pictures by the Chemical Agency of Light. With 30 Engravings. By Robert Hunt. 3s. 6d.]

1842

TALBOT, WILLIAM HENRY FOX.

“Promotions and Preferments. Births.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (Mar. 1842): 320-321. [“…Feb… 5. At Lacock Abbey, Wilts, the wife of H Talbot, esq. a son and heir,…” p. 321.]

COLLEN.

“Photographic Portraiture on Paper.” GENTLEMAN’S MAGAZINE (May 1842): 526. [“Through the calotype process likenesses are now produced by the camera obscura, upon paper prepared with chemical combinations of silver. The lightest part of the object is thus represented by black on the paper in the camera, whilst the darkest part makes no impression on the paper. This reversed picture (for such it is) is laid on another prepared paper, and is submitted to the influence of light, which passing through the first, blackens the paper underneath in those parts which had not been affected in the camera operation, and the result obtained is an exact reverse of effect. These likenesses, which are produced by Mr. Collen, of Somerset-street, may be multiplied to any extent.”]

Etc., Etc.

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